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This is the basic turning stroke. If you do repeated forward strokes on the same side of the boat, you’ll notice that the boat slowly turns the other way. The sweep stroke simply exaggerates this effect. The sweep is the same as a forward stroke, except that you alter the blade path so that it carves a much wider arc on the side of the boat. Sweep strokes on the right side of the boat will turn the boat left and left-side sweep strokes will turn the boat right.
Natalie has loved all things nature since she was a child and found at an early age that writing is the best way for her to convey her personal experiences colorfully. She hopes to inspire others to not only enjoy this amazing earth we live on, but to protect it at all costs. She owns a soap company called Pop Cauldron and enjoy songwriting, rock climbing, and spending time outside with her cats, Reginald, Hamilton, and Josephine.
Fiberglass hulls are stiffer than polyethylene hulls, but they are more prone to damage from impact, including cracking. Most modern kayaks have steep V sections at the bow and stern, and a shallow V amidships. Fiberglass kayaks need to be "laid-up" in a mold by hand, so are usually more expensive than polyethylene kayaks, which are rotationally molded in a machine.
Be sure to take the weight capacity into account not only so you can decide if it will hold your kayak but also so that you are sure your vehicle will be able to tow it at full capacity. Checking how many kayaks it will tow is also important as well as the length of kayak suitable for it. This will show you if you will have the option to tow paddleboards and canoes as well. Finally, be sure to check the crossbar width as well as the warranty that comes with.
Kayaks come in very different shapes and sizes, what you need in a kayak trailer depends on whether you’re hauling whitewater, sea, touring or fishing kayaks. GO and GO Easy Adventure Trailers were designed to accommodate all types of boats. In our photo gallery, you can see examples of different types of kayaks and how they fit—although the possibilities certainly don’t stop there!
How much your kayak weighs is entirely dependent on what type of kayak you get. You can get a kayak that weighs 20 pounds or some that weighs 80 pounds, all sizes in between and a few outliers on either extreme. You can get an inflatable kayak that will weigh less than 10 pounds and you can get a heavy duty one that weighs 100 – it’s all up to you. There are three main materials from which kayaks are made are Polyethylene, Fiberglass or Composite. Poly is a type of plastic and is the least expensive (but heaviest). Fiberglass is a mid range for both weight and price and composite is the most expensive and lightest. You get what you pay for; and a kayak is no different.

is very important. Smoother the ride, the better shape your kayaks going to be when you get to the water. If you’re going on rough bumpy gravel roads, then the suspension is important. A lot of kayak trailers are less expensive because they don’t have suspension or offered very minimal suspension. In some cases, you might not need suspension. For example, if you are staying on smooth and well-paved roads, then your kayak trailers less likely to bounce around a lot. However, if you’re going on any gravel roads or off-road conditions, then you want to strongly consider suspension and vibration reduction.
You might think current is a nightmare to fish in a kayak, but that’s actually far from the truth – provided you know how to use it to your advantage. Most kayaks are short and light enough to actually sit entirely in an eddy, preventing the boat from moving downstream, and giving you plenty of time to thoroughly fish the corresponding current seam. To maximize this, go past the spot you want to fish, then tuck into the eddy behind it, and fish until your heart’s content – without even having to paddle.
Be visible—Kayaks come in various colors, including many highly visible ones. (The color does’t change your fishing productivity. Kayaks are stealthy and often will bump into fish before they notice it.) Paddles also come in various high-vis colors. Reflective tape can be used to increase visibility. Other visibility options: colorful or reflective PFD and clothing, bright flags and lights, and a safety whistle or air horn.
You can kayak in any body of water: Our wonderful world is full of diverse environments which can be explored from the seat of your kayak. With portable equipment that can be easily launched from any dock, riverside or shore, your kayak can travel with you to some of the most beautiful destinations in the world. River, lakes, oceans and more — your possibilities for exploring are endless.
If you lose control of your kayak, don’t fight it. Imagine driving down a road and losing control of your car due to ice, dirt or other slick conditions. Trying to regain control of the vehicle abruptly could cause you to overcorrect and make the situation worse. Instead, it’s best to maintain as much control of the car as possible and move in the direction of the vehicle. The same applies to kayaking. If you suddenly start to spin, move with the kayak and adjust accordingly.

A passion for kayaking can take many shapes—from plunging over epic waterfalls to fishing in secluded waters to taking your family out for a fun day on the lake. Fortunately, GO Adventure Trailers for kayakers can take all kinds of shapes as well. Here’s our guide to the ultimate adventure trailer options for kayakers, whether you’re hauling whitewater, sea, touring or fishing kayaks. Whatever your adventure style, your GO or GO Easy can get you there with everything you need and the people you want to make memories with.
Entry level kayak anglers will find quality information, regional blogs with kayak fishing info and tutorials, direction to all the fisheries and a lot more in the weeks and months ahead.  After more than 20 years reaching anglers making their first searches, we’re adding resources for veteran kayak anglers too.  Pour through the site menu and feel free to contact us for info or send a fishy picture anytime along the way.

Purchased the 4x5 Paddlesport/Utility trailer in late August after searching hi and low for a suitable transport for our kayaks. We are getting too old to lift 55Lbs + kayaks on to a car roof but want to continue using them in NH. Reviewed Malone and Loadrite and decided on the Dock Doctors after considering price, quality and functionality. Used once and loved the trailer.


Just like the one handed cast, efficient kayak angling requires skill in handling a paddle with one hand. Paddling a kayak is simple with two hands, as the rhythm comes easily to even the least experienced of anglers. But what do you do when you’re fighting a fish with one hand, and you’ve got to steer your boat back upstream to get on the other side of a laydown or avoid an overhanging branch? Practice locking the shaft of your paddle along a forearm, which anchors it along your arm, and allows you to use it more like a canoe paddle.

Plan your first few trips to be short and safe. Choose a bright and sunny day that doesn’t have a forecast of rain or high winds to keep your environmental challenges as predictable as possible. Also, know your limits and underestimate the amount of time you can safely kayak before you get fatigued. Like other workouts, you don’t want to overdo your first kayaking trips and make it difficult to paddle back to shore. Limit your first trip to an hour and then extend as you feel comfortable.
Is it time to think about getting a kayak trailer? If you just bought a kayak (congratulations!), you may have come to the quick realization that getting it from your home to the water looked a lot easier in the brochure. You may have tried roof racks, cam straps or even stuffing it into your buddies hatchback – nothing working quite how you had envisioned it. Kayak manufacturers have focused on stability and performance in their recent designs, often sacrificing portability. The result has been a kayak that is great on the water but not great to get to the water! Our favorite way to make your time with your new boat feel less like a CrossFit workout and more like the brochure is a kayak trailer!
A kayak trailer easily tows behind most vehicles and typically requires a simple hitch and electrical connection to enable brake lights. They are low to the ground, easier to load and are able to carry even the largest of kayaks, making them the perfect solution to the kayak-wrestling dilemma. Many of the most popular trailers are also able to haul bicycles, canoes and even cargo boxes, making them as versatile as any roof rack and, with multiple sizes available, many trailers surpass roof racks in carrying capacity.

Malone is a standout company when it comes to trailers. Not only do they use high quality materials but they think their designs through. They believe so strongly in their product that they include a 5 year warranty. The Auto Racks MicroSport Trailer can carry up to 4 kayaks or canoes weighing up to 350 lbs. and up to 19 feet in length. This extended length even makes it compatible to carry your SUP boards making this trailer increasingly desirable. The Auto Racks MicroSport Trailer can even be classified as the best fishing kayak trailer as it can haul some of the longest kayaks on the market.
Strip-built designs are similar in shape to rigid fiberglass kayaks but are generally both lighter and tougher. Like their fiberglass counterparts the shape and size of the boat determines performance and optimal uses. The hull and deck are built with thin strips of lightweight wood, often cedar, pine or Redwood. The strips are edge-glued together around a form, stapled or clamped in place, and allowed to dry. Structural strength comes from a layer of fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin, layered inside and outside the hull. Strip–built kayaks are sold commercially by a few companies, priced USD 4,000 and up. An experienced woodworker can build one for about USD 400 in 200 hours, though the exact cost and time depend on the builder's skill, the materials and the size and design. As a second kayak project, or for the serious builder with some woodworking expertise, a strip–built boat can be an impressive piece of work. Kits with pre-cut and milled wood strips are commercially available.

Malone made this heavy duty Xtralight trailer that has a military grade galvanized steel frame you can trust. With leaf spring suspension you can be assured that your kayaks will be protected even on bumpy roads. The heavy duty axle features 2 sets of padded V racks which allow you to transport your kayaks without a scratch. With a 2 kayak capacity, it is clear to see why this is the best multiple kayak trailer. Malone includes everything you need to pull your 2 kayak trailer including 12 foot load straps and mounting hardware.

Explore the Arctic and Antarctic coastlines in a kayakOne of the best features of Polar Region cruises is that you’re never done exploring. Even if you feel you’ve walked all over the Arctic or Antarctic, climbed every mountain, and said hello to every possible penguin, there’s still another whole world to explore – the water. Polar cruise kayaking is an amazing way to slip into the white and blue beauty of the quiet oceans around you.

Whitewater kayaks are rotomolded in a semi-rigid, high impact plastic, usually polyethylene. Careful construction ensures that the boat remains structurally sound when subjected to fast-moving water. The plastic hull allows these kayaks to bounce off rocks without leaking, although they scratch and eventually puncture with enough use. Whitewater kayaks range from 4 to 10 feet (1.2 to 3.0 m) long. There are two main types of whitewater kayak:


Inuit kayak builders had specific measurements for their boats. The length was typically three times the span of his outstretched arms. The width at the cockpit was the width of the builder's hips plus two fists (and sometimes less). The typical depth was his fist plus the outstretched thumb (hitch hiker). Thus typical dimensions were about 17 feet (5.2 m) long by 20–22 inches (51–56 cm) wide by 7 inches (18 cm) deep. This measurement system confounded early European explorers who tried to duplicate the kayak, because each kayak was a little different.
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