How much your kayak weighs is entirely dependent on what type of kayak you get. You can get a kayak that weighs 20 pounds or some that weighs 80 pounds, all sizes in between and a few outliers on either extreme. You can get an inflatable kayak that will weigh less than 10 pounds and you can get a heavy duty one that weighs 100 – it’s all up to you. There are three main materials from which kayaks are made are Polyethylene, Fiberglass or Composite. Poly is a type of plastic and is the least expensive (but heaviest). Fiberglass is a mid range for both weight and price and composite is the most expensive and lightest. You get what you pay for; and a kayak is no different.

While you should always exercise caution when engaging in any watersport or physical activity, kayaking can be a safe and fun experience as long as you practice it safely. Always pack your essential gear, understand the conditions of the weather and water and make every attempt to act as responsibly as possible. Remember — the safe kayaking is smart kayaking.


The design of a sea/touring kayak is perfect for gliding over open water, whether you’re out on the ocean, lake, estuary, or a river without rapids. These long boats are built to withstand wind and waves and travel long distances across the open water. However, they raise unique challenges when it comes to transportation because of their length—up to 18 feet long!
Once you’ve mastered how to kayak as a beginner, you may want to enhance your skill level and eventually take on whitewater kayaking. We don’t blame you — whitewater kayaking can be an exhilarating experience that allows you to view nature from a perspective like no other. If you get to the point where you’d like to consider taking on this challenge, here are a few whitewater kayaking tips you should know:
Oru Bay ST folding kayak. Barely used!. Condition is Used.     This a fantastic and ingenious kayak. Very portable and stowable for those with limited space or those that want to travel with their kayak. I have used it maybe 10 times at the most, which is why I am selling it. I have a smaller, cheaper kayak.    I am including the float bags, carry strap, and repair kit. Not sure how I will ship it yet, but I will make sure it gets to you. Kayak is 12' long, 25" wide, 28 lbs. Max capacity of 300 lbs. Very smooth and fast paddling kayak. Great for small lakes to open water.
Entry level kayak anglers will find quality information, regional blogs with kayak fishing info and tutorials, direction to all the fisheries and a lot more in the weeks and months ahead.  After more than 20 years reaching anglers making their first searches, we’re adding resources for veteran kayak anglers too.  Pour through the site menu and feel free to contact us for info or send a fishy picture anytime along the way.
Tyler is a Wisconsin native currently residing in beautiful Western Wisconsin with his wife and children. Tyler is an avid kayak angler, participating in online Kayak Bass Fishing/TourneyX tournaments. He also shares his experiences through his blog, Small Craft Fisherman. He loves to share his passion of kayak fishing with others, teach others, and watch them succeed. Thus, he and his wife decided to start a new kayak fishing guide and sales business in Western Wisconsin called Small Craft Outfitters. Feel free to reach out to him via his guide page, blog, or associated social media accounts.
Stitch & Glue designs typically use modern, marine-grade plywood — eighth-inch, 3 millimetres (0.12 in) or up to quarter-inch, 5 millimetres (0.20 in) thick. After cutting out the required pieces of hull and deck (kits often have these pre-cut), a series of small holes are drilled along the edges. Copper wire is then used to "stitch" the pieces together through the holes. After the pieces are temporarily stitched together, they are glued with epoxy and the seams reinforced with fiberglass. When the epoxy dries, the copper stitches are removed. Sometimes the entire boat is then covered in fiberglass for additional strength and waterproofing though this adds greatly to the weight and is unnecessary. Construction is fairly straightforward, but because plywood does not bend to form compound curves, design choices are limited. This is a good choice for the first-time kayak builder as the labor and skills required (especially for kit versions) is considerably less than for strip-built boats which can take 3 times as long to build.
The more kayaks you own and the more often you use them will determine how much you would benefit from a kayak trailer. It’s true that for one (or maybe 2) you can toss it in the back (and front) of your SUV or strap it to a roof rack but even that is definitely a struggle that you won’t want to do frequently. Even if you have a smooth and uncomplicated method of transporting your kayak, that doesn’t mean you have a good method of hauling it from truck to beach or dock. A hand trailer to pull your kayak from the car to your tent and then to the water will go a long way in keeping your outing stress-free.
A: Most kayaks aren’t meant to be locked onto a trailer. You can attach a lock to the strapping system found on most kayak trailers but this will only slow down people looking to steal your gear. This can be ok for a short term stop but we strongly suggest that you don’t leave your car unattended with anything on your trailer. You should do your shopping and prepare for the trip beforehand.
Kayaks can also be classified by their design and the materials from which they are made. Each design has its specific advantage, including performance, manoeuvrability, stability and paddling style. Kayaks can be made of metal, fibreglass, wood, plastic, fabrics, and inflatable fabrics such as PVC or rubber, and more recently expensive but feather light carbon fiber. Each material also has its specific advantage, including strength, durability, portability, flexibility, resistance to ultraviolet and storage requirements. For example, wooden kayaks can be created from kits or built by hand. Stitch and glue, plywood kayaks can be lighter than any other material except skin-on frame. Inflatable kayaks, made from lightweight fabric, can be deflated and easily transported and stored, and are considered to be remarkably tough and durable compared to some hard-sided boats.[9][10]
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