You can kayak virtually anywhere in the world with a large enough body of water. Unlike some other vessels, you can strap a kayak to the roof of your car and head out on a new adventure. You can explore calm lakes, river rapids, quiet creeks and serene seas. One of the greatest advantages of kayaking is you can have an exciting journey across the water both near and far. Here are just a few destinations where we suggest you remember to pack your paddle:
Some modern boats vary considerably from a traditional design but still claim the title "kayak", for instance in eliminating the cockpit by seating the paddler on top of the boat ("sit-on-top" kayaks); having inflated air chambers surrounding the boat; replacing the single hull by twin hulls, and replacing paddles with other human-powered propulsion methods, such as foot-powered rotational propellers and "flippers". Kayaks are also being sailed, as well as propelled by means of small electric motors, and even by outboard gas engines.
Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. It is distinguished from canoeing by the sitting position of the paddler and the number of blades on the paddle. A kayak is a low-to-the-water, canoe-like boat in which the paddler sits facing forward, legs in front, using a double-bladed paddle to pull front-to-back on one side and then the other in rotation.[1] Most kayaks have closed decks, although sit-on-top and inflatable kayaks are growing in popularity as well.[2]
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