As there is a wide selection of options when it comes to kayak trailers, understanding what you are buying is important. To get a full picture of the trailer you are choosing you will want to thoroughly compare trailer options to others on the market. Not just in price but in features as well. Looking at the trailer weight is especially important in determining what type of car you will need to tow it.
A wheeled carrier that will haul your kayak for you is a kayak trailer. You will either attach it to your vehicle, (Car, truck, SUV – whatever you have that will take the weight) or you will pull it yourself. (Whereas you become the vehicle that hauls it, but you do it more easily than dragging it on your own.) You could also attach one to your bike and allow it to pull for you. Often kayaks carriers intended for your bike can double as hand trailers, too. Kayak trailers will haul your kayaks great distances (on a truck or perhaps bike trailer) or just help you in getting the kayak into the water (like a hand trailer that will let you transport the kayak shorter distances.)

Whether you need a simple one/two capacity trailer to help you move your boat around or a mega-rack on wheels that can hold up to a dozen kayaks or more, the basic trailer is simply a kayak rack on wheels, hauled behind a vehicle. Adding multiple tiers, including a floor or better yet a full-frame gear box, turns a simple wheeled frame into a major piece of kayak utility transport. The number and type of racks,  support bars and storage area, as well as other components (wheels, signals, tongue length and strength) all come into consideration when determining what kind of trailer will best serve your needs.
We reviewed dozens of kayak trailers to identify the best of the best. When looking for a trailer for your kayak (or kayaks), there are some features you’ll want to consider and we found the what and the why of which does what. We looked at kayak trailers you tow with your vehicle and hand trailers that let you get your kayaks into the water without the chaos.

Tyler is a Wisconsin native currently residing in beautiful Western Wisconsin with his wife and children. Tyler is an avid kayak angler, participating in online Kayak Bass Fishing/TourneyX tournaments. He also shares his experiences through his blog, Small Craft Fisherman. He loves to share his passion of kayak fishing with others, teach others, and watch them succeed. Thus, he and his wife decided to start a new kayak fishing guide and sales business in Western Wisconsin called Small Craft Outfitters. Feel free to reach out to him via his guide page, blog, or associated social media accounts.


Small Boats Tandem Kayak Packages Touring Kayaks Kids' Kayaks Top Kayak Brands Fishing Stocking Stuffers Camo Fishing Combos Perception Kayaks Sit-on-Top Kayaks 2-person Kayaks Pelican Kayaks Sun Dolphin Kayaks Inflatable Kayaks Best Kayaks in 2019 Old Town Canoe Kayaks Blue Kayaks Pink Kayaks Sea Eagle Kayaks Lifetime Kayaks Red Kayaks Sevylor Kayaks Green & Teal Kayaks White Kayaks Single Kayaks Double Kayaks Emotion Kayaks Sit Inside Single Kayaks Sit-in Inflatable Kayaks Gray Kayaks Advanced Elements Kayaks Aquaglide Kayaks Rod Holders Kayaks Yellow Kayaks Dry Storage Kayaks Tan Kayaks Brown Kayaks Orange Kayaks Purple Kayaks Emotion Recreation Kayaks Sun Dolphin Recreation Kayaks Old Town Canoe Sit Inside Kayaks Pelican Recreation Kayaks Recreation Inflatable Kayaks Perception Sit Inside Kayaks Single Recreation Kayaks Double Recreation Kayaks Sun Dolphin Sit Inside Kayaks Field & Stream Sit Inside Kayaks Sevylor Sit Inside Kayaks Lifetime Recreation Kayaks Lifetime Includes Paddle Kayaks Field & Stream Single Kayaks Field & Stream Dry Storage Kayaks Sit Inside Dry Storage Kayaks Perception Recreation Kayaks Old Town Canoe Recreation Kayaks Pelican Sit Inside Kayaks

Contemporary traditional-style kayaks trace their origins primarily to the native boats of Alaska, northern Canada, and Southwest Greenland. Wooden kayaks and fabric kayaks on wooden frames dominated the market up until the 1950s, when fiberglass boats were first introduced in the US, and inflatable rubberized fabric boats were first introduced in Europe. Rotomolded plastic kayaks first appeared in 1973, and most kayaks today are made from roto-molded polyethylene resins. The development of plastic and rubberized inflatable kayaks arguably initiated the development of freestyle kayaking as we see it today, since these boats could be made smaller, stronger and more resilient than fiberglass boats.
Contemporary traditional-style kayaks trace their origins primarily to the native boats of Alaska, northern Canada, and Southwest Greenland. Wooden kayaks and fabric kayaks on wooden frames dominated the market up until the 1950s, when fiberglass boats were first introduced in the US, and inflatable rubberized fabric boats were first introduced in Europe. Rotomolded plastic kayaks first appeared in 1973, and most kayaks today are made from roto-molded polyethylene resins. The development of plastic and rubberized inflatable kayaks arguably initiated the development of freestyle kayaking as we see it today, since these boats could be made smaller, stronger and more resilient than fiberglass boats.

Primary stability is often a big concern to a beginner, while secondary stability matters both to beginners and experienced travelers. By example, a wide, flat-bottomed kayak will have high primary stability and feel very stable on flat water. However, when a steep wave breaks on such a boat, it can be easily overturned because the flat bottom is no longer level. By contrast, a kayak with a narrower, more rounded hull with more hull flare can be edged or leaned into waves and (in the hands of a skilled kayaker) provides a safer, more comfortable response on stormy seas. Kayaks with only moderate primary, but excellent secondary stability are, in general, considered more seaworthy, especially in challenging conditions.
Traditional multi-hull vessels such as catamarans and outrigger canoes benefit from increased lateral stability without sacrificing speed, and these advantages have been successfully applied in twin hull kayaks. Outrigger kayaks attach one or two smaller hulls to the main hull to enhance stability, especially for fishing, touring, kayak sailing and motorized kayaking. Twin hull kayaks feature two long and narrow hulls, and since all their buoyancy is distributed as far as possible from their center line, they are stabler than mono hull kayaks outfitted with outriggers.

I decided to try kayak fishing. I’d fished as a kid, on occasion as a teen, but hadn’t done much in my adult life. So I started casting lines from a used kayak in April of 2013. I got into kayak fishing thinking that it would be a good marketing angle, to pick up some skills, and to relate to that portion of the paddle-sports market. I also thought it wouldn’t hurt to appeal to the larger fishing market. I had no idea that this motivation would quickly turn into an absolute obsession, and that within me lay dormant a passion that exploded with that first cast and that first kayak caught bass.
Paddle: A paddle is as essential as the kayak itself. When choosing paddles, you’ll need to consider the measurement of your torso and the width of kayak you’ll be paddling. There are sizing charts available but generally, torso heights over 28 inches will use paddle lengths of 200 centimeters and above, torso heights under 28 inches will use paddle lengths under 200 centimeters.
The second tournament of the Hobie Bass Open Series took place a while a ago on Lake Shasta, California. Headwaters Adventures, as well as the US. Forest Service sponsored the event, which was a huge success by all accounts. A large number of spotted, largemouth, and smallmouth bass were caught over the course of the two-day, equal opportunity event, which operated under special use permit with the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Read More
A: If all is correct with your kayak trailer than there is no distance limit to towing it behind your car. This depends on 2 main things. First, you must ensure that the weight of your kayak trailer remains in the safe towable limit of your cars hitch rating. Second, you will want to ensure that your kayaks are properly secured. If all of this is correct, then you will have no problems towing your kayak trailer for long distance travel.
Whether you need a simple one/two capacity trailer to help you move your boat around or a mega-rack on wheels that can hold up to a dozen kayaks or more, the basic trailer is simply a kayak rack on wheels, hauled behind a vehicle. Adding multiple tiers, including a floor or better yet a full-frame gear box, turns a simple wheeled frame into a major piece of kayak utility transport. The number and type of racks,  support bars and storage area, as well as other components (wheels, signals, tongue length and strength) all come into consideration when determining what kind of trailer will best serve your needs.
In the 1740s, Russian explorers led by Vitus Bering came in contact with the Aleutians, who had taken the basic kayak concept and developed multiple designs specifically for hunting, transportation, and environmental conditions. They soon recognized the Aleutians were very skillful at hunting sea otters by kayak. Because otters were a popular commodity in Europe and Asia, they would exploit and even kidnap Aleutians and keep them aboard their ships to work and hunt.[5]
×