There seem to be no anthropometry stats of kayakers, who may not be representative of the general population. In the American civilian population of the early 1960s, about 0.7% of men and 9% of women weighed under 50 kg (110 lb); 20% of men and 7% of women weighed over 190 pounds (86 kg).[10] In the same population in the late sixties, the average weight of both male and female children crossed 50 kg (110 lb) at age thirteen. In the early 2000s, it was a year or two earlier, and the mean weight of adults was over 10 kg (22 lb) heavier. Also in the early 2000s, the mean weight of men was 190 pounds (86 kg), and the mean weight of women was 163 pounds (74 kg).[11]
This is the best 4 kayak trailer that can hold up to 4 kayaks. Like most trailers on our list this one is made from marine grade galvanized steel. The frame is a T-Box design that uses a leaf spring suspension system. You won’t have to worry about the axle as it’s also galvanized and heavy duty. The wheels are on the smaller size at 8 inches but can still carry up to 4 full sized kayaks, stand up paddle boards or even canoes weighing up to 275 lbs. Your gear will rest on foam blocks included with this trailer.
We reviewed dozens of kayak trailers to identify the best of the best. When looking for a trailer for your kayak (or kayaks), there are some features you’ll want to consider and we found the what and the why of which does what. We looked at kayak trailers you tow with your vehicle and hand trailers that let you get your kayaks into the water without the chaos.
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq, Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᔭᖅ) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood, as many of the areas of their construction were treeless. Archaeologists have found evidence indicating that kayaks are at least 4000 years old.[1] The oldest still existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich.[citation needed]
Native people made many types of boat for different purposes. The Aleut baidarka was made in double or triple cockpit designs, for hunting and transporting passengers or goods. An umiak is a large open sea canoe, ranging from 17 to 30 feet (5.2 to 9.1 m), made with seal skins and wood. It is considered a kayak although it was originally paddled with single-bladed paddles, and typically had more than one paddler.

Fishing kayaks have been surging in popularity. These craft allow you to move stealthily across the water without the expense, upkeep, and fuel needed for a larger boat. Fishing kayaks are designed for comfort and stability and they come with convenient features for anglers, from rod holders to livewells. The challenge with fishing kayaks is that they’re often too heavy to load onto the roof of a car or SUV. It’s common for fishing kayaks to weigh over 75 pounds and some weigh over 125 pounds!


In the 1740s, Russian explorers led by Vitus Bering came in contact with the Aleutians, who had taken the basic kayak concept and developed multiple designs specifically for hunting, transportation, and environmental conditions. They soon recognized the Aleutians were very skillful at hunting sea otters by kayak. Because otters were a popular commodity in Europe and Asia, they would exploit and even kidnap Aleutians and keep them aboard their ships to work and hunt.[5]
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