Hello Anglers, Spring is showing here on the California coast and will be coming to all the kayak fisheries soon! Several years in the making, here’s a fresh version of the website that compliments the beginning of a new era for the Kayakfishing.com effort.  We turn “21” in August! “The Olde Site”– The pioneer online venue to the sport, Kayakfishing.com has been a first stop for the majority of kayak anglers making their first online searches for over 20 years.  Many anglers have saved a fortune through our direct referrals, kayak recommendations and guiding anglers on how not to ruin and […]

2) Don’t bring your most expensive rods on the kayak your first few times on the water. You will probably flip (or turtle) once or twice, better to lose or break cheap rods than to watch your favorite ones float to the bottom of a deep lake. If anyone ever finds my 3 nice Abu Garcia rods at the bottom of Summersville Lake in WV, let me know. I did rescue my daughter’s hat though before turtling. 🙂
I decided to try kayak fishing. I’d fished as a kid, on occasion as a teen, but hadn’t done much in my adult life. So I started casting lines from a used kayak in April of 2013. I got into kayak fishing thinking that it would be a good marketing angle, to pick up some skills, and to relate to that portion of the paddle-sports market. I also thought it wouldn’t hurt to appeal to the larger fishing market. I had no idea that this motivation would quickly turn into an absolute obsession, and that within me lay dormant a passion that exploded with that first cast and that first kayak caught bass.
How much your kayak weighs is entirely dependent on what type of kayak you get. You can get a kayak that weighs 20 pounds or some that weighs 80 pounds, all sizes in between and a few outliers on either extreme. You can get an inflatable kayak that will weigh less than 10 pounds and you can get a heavy duty one that weighs 100 – it’s all up to you. There are three main materials from which kayaks are made are Polyethylene, Fiberglass or Composite. Poly is a type of plastic and is the least expensive (but heaviest). Fiberglass is a mid range for both weight and price and composite is the most expensive and lightest. You get what you pay for; and a kayak is no different.
There are many types of kayaks used in flat water and whitewater kayaking. The sizes and shapes vary drastically depending on what type of water to be paddled on and also what the paddler would like to do. The second set of essentials for kayaking is an off-set paddle where the paddle blades are tilted to help reduce wind resistance while the other blade is being used in the water. These vary in length and also shape depending on the intended use, height of the paddler, and the paddler's preference. Kayaks should be equipped with one or more buoyancy aid (also called flotation) which creates air space that helps prevent a kayak from sinking when filled with water. A life jacket should be worn at all times (also called a personal flotation device or PFD), and a helmet is also often required for most kayaking and is mandatory for white water kayaking.[11][12] Various other pieces of safety gear include a whistle for signaling for help; throwing ropes to help rescue other kayakers; and, a diving knife and appropriate water shoes should used depending upon the risks the water and terrain pose. Proper clothing such as a dry suit, wetsuit or spray top also help protect kayakers from cold water or air temperatures.[13]
River and Trail Outfitters provides quality kayaks & canoes and the widest variety of rental trips on the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers as well as Antietam Creek. For novice kayaking and canoeing, there are scenic mellow water trips featuring beautiful scenery and wildlife. For more experienced boaters, there are a variety of beginner to intermediate whitewater runs in and around Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.
Be sure to take the weight capacity into account not only so you can decide if it will hold your kayak but also so that you are sure your vehicle will be able to tow it at full capacity. Checking how many kayaks it will tow is also important as well as the length of kayak suitable for it. This will show you if you will have the option to tow paddleboards and canoes as well. Finally, be sure to check the crossbar width as well as the warranty that comes with.
It’s also a good idea to identify spots on your route like bays or accessible shorelines where you can stop to take a break if needed. If you end up off course, make sure you have a nautical map or compass with you. Though GPS and other electronic navigational equipment are helpful, if they were to become inoperable, you would then have a reliable backup with a physical map.

Our favorite part of this trailer is that once you detach it from your vehicle, you can use a kick stand of sorts and still use your raw strength to maneuver this trailer around. We wouldn’t go so far as to call it a hand trailer in this mode, but you won’t need to park it in the exact right spot. – Which will save those of us who struggle backing up with a trailer a lot of pain and headache.


Whitewater kayaking or canoeing is a great way to enjoy the outdoors while choosing your level of adventure. Zoar Outdoor offers full-day white water kayaking and canoeing lessons on the Deerfield River to suit every level of paddler. Whether you are interested in an introduction to the sport of kayaking or canoeing or taking your kayaking skills to the next level with a playboating, river rescue or other clinics, our kayak school has a course for you.
Multiple kayak space. As we mentioned a few times, you may want to plan ahead for multiple kayaks, even if you only have one now. If for no other reason than you can better accommodate your own trips. After all, adventures are often enjoyed better with a partner. Not to mention the fact that having an adventure buddy makes your outing more safe. Should the worst happen, you’ll be grateful you have someone there with you; it could save your life. (And with that safety net of another person, you can get into more adventurous adventures.)

When it’s windy, or when paddling up-current, it takes a lot of effort to make any headway, much less fish. In these situations, use the minimal draft of your kayak to your advantage. Instead of paddling right down the middle of the river or lake, get as shallow as you can. The current is much less in super skinny water, and wind and waves are also mitigated by shoreline vegetation and structures, you’ll paddle more efficiently, and you’re going to have much more energy once you get to your honey hole.


Kayaks are long—19 feet (5.8 m), short—6 feet (1.8 m), wide—42 inches (110 cm), or as narrow as the paddler's hips. They may attach one or two stabilizing hulls (outriggers), have twin hulls like catamarans, inflate or fold. They move via paddles, pedals that turn propellers or underwater flippers, under sail, or motor. They're made of wood/canvas, wood, carbon fiber, fiberglass, Kevlar, polyethylene, polyester, rubberized fabric, neoprene, nitrylon, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane, and aluminum. They may sport rudders, fins, bulkheads, seats, eyelets, foot braces and cargo hatches. They accommodate 1-3 or more paddlers/riders.
is very important. Smoother the ride, the better shape your kayaks going to be when you get to the water. If you’re going on rough bumpy gravel roads, then the suspension is important. A lot of kayak trailers are less expensive because they don’t have suspension or offered very minimal suspension. In some cases, you might not need suspension. For example, if you are staying on smooth and well-paved roads, then your kayak trailers less likely to bounce around a lot. However, if you’re going on any gravel roads or off-road conditions, then you want to strongly consider suspension and vibration reduction.

You may also want to pick up a kayak trailer if you’re thinking long-term. If you have a lifestyle that lends to adventure, then its reasonable to assume you’ll make friends or build a family that will join you kayaking. It’s not a bad idea to pick a trailer up before you build that family because you’ll probably better be able to afford it. And, to put it a way that will appeal to your self-interest: if you’re the person that has the kayak trailer, you’re pretty much guaranteed invites for excursions.
Flight New York - Washington (JFK - DCA) $24+ Flight New York - Washington (LGA - DCA) $28+ Flight Boston - Washington (BOS - DCA) $59+ Flight Orlando - Washington (MCO - DCA) $97+ Flight Minneapolis - Washington (MSP - IAD) $107+ Flight Minneapolis - Washington (MSP - DCA) $117+ Flight Chicago - Washington (ORD - DCA) $150+ Flight Detroit - Washington (DTW - DCA) $151+ Flight Fort Lauderdale - Washington (FLL - DCA) $168+ Flight Miami - Washington (MIA - DCA) $192+ Flight Los Angeles - Washington (LAX - DCA) $204+ Flight Los Angeles - Washington (LAX - IAD) $204+ Flight San Francisco - Washington (SFO - IAD) $206+ Flight Dallas - Washington (DFW - DCA) $208+
Flight Denver - Chicago (DEN - ORD) $63+ Flight Dallas - Chicago (DFW - ORD) $97+ Flight Minneapolis - Chicago (MSP - ORD) $97+ Flight Washington - Chicago (BWI - ORD) $106+ Flight Atlanta - Chicago (ATL - ORD) $109+ Flight New York - Chicago (LGA - ORD) $116+ Flight Miami - Chicago (MIA - ORD) $118+ Flight Orlando - Chicago (MCO - ORD) $122+ Flight Los Angeles - Chicago (LAX - ORD) $123+

Straps. Of course you want to secure your kayak to the trailer before you drive off with it. (And always make sure the straps are tight and the kayak isn’t moving before leaving.) But keep in mind that even hand trailers will need straps to keep them secure. You don’t plan on bumps and trips, but they happen and if your kayak isn’t strapped down then you may have to struggle reloading in the most inconvenient places. Or worse yet, the fall could damage your kayak and then you’re up the creek – without a boat.
Inuit kayak builders had specific measurements for their boats. The length was typically three times the span of his outstretched arms. The width at the cockpit was the width of the builder's hips plus two fists (and sometimes less). The typical depth was his fist plus the outstretched thumb (hitch hiker). Thus typical dimensions were about 17 feet (5.2 m) long by 20–22 inches (51–56 cm) wide by 7 inches (18 cm) deep. This measurement system confounded early European explorers who tried to duplicate the kayak, because each kayak was a little different.
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