FishUSA now offers fishing kayaks, which are designed from the water up for anglers and their equipment. These modern kayaks differ from the original hunting kayaks of the Arctic in many ways. Instead of stretching skins or other material over an internal frame, modern kayaks are roto-molded in durable plastics. Polyethylene resins are used to make a hard, hollow shell to support the angler, as well as a wide range of accessories, while also being a bit flexible and impact resistant. Modern fishing kayaks typically do not feature an enclosed compartment like their predecessors did. Due to the physical actions of paddling a low-profile boat while needing access to all equipment at a moment’s notice, the standard design referred to as “sit-on-top” is the preferred style for fishing kayaks. The angler sits on top of the hollow shell which is designed to be in contact with the lower back, legs and feet of the paddler to gain maneuverability while remaining stable. Built-in dry storage compartments and other features allow for storage of tackle, provisions and other items you would want to keep dry. Some fishing kayaks even have live bait compartments built right into the shell.

Folding kayaks are direct descendants of the skin-on-frame boats used by the Inuit and Greenlandic peoples. Modern folding kayaks are constructed from a wooden or aluminum frame over which is placed a synthetic skin made of polyester, cotton canvas, polyurethane, or Hypalon. They are more expensive than inflatable kayaks, but have the advantage of greater stiffness and consequently better seaworthiness.

It is important to consider how long of a kayak your trailer will be able to accommodate for the main reason if you don’t want a lot of overhang. Having overhang on your trailer can result in your kayak not sitting as securely and can risk an accident. More than just tandem kayaks, ocean kayaks tend to be a lot longer in length as well so be sure to consider this before purchasing.

Refurbished Oru Bay ST touring kayak. Bought directly from Oru and used once on calm water. Easy to assemble, tracks great, and picks up speed in a hurry! Great condition! Great for lake and coastal rock garden paddling! Decided to move to a longer boat now that I have more room for storage. Perfect for apartment dwellers or people that don’t want to pay a fortune for a kayak rack on your car. Shipping within continental U.S. is free!

The Malone XtraLight 2 Kayak Package with V style Kayak Carriers is designed to carry two kayaks (or canoes, if that better suits your fancy – or if you like the versatility of being able to use this one trailer for both). You can fit a decently wide kayak on the rack, up to 29″ width will fit comfortably in each slot. You’ll place these kayaks into the trailer bottom down and count on the extra padding to protect them.
Member of Natural State Kayak Anglers (NSKA) and participant in Kayak Bass Fishing (KBF), Kayak Bass Series (KBS), Razoryak Tournmanent Trail (RTT) and other regional kayak fishing tournament trails. My goal is to share the great, growing sport of kayak fishing and to support brands I value and use. Helping new kayak anglers get started is important, particularly in sharing tips and information on kayaks, gear and baits. Currently already working with various nationally known bait company brands to help with grass roots promotion of their products.
The other primary type is the creek boat, which gets its name from its purpose: running narrow, low-volume waterways. Creekboats are longer and have far more volume than playboats, which makes them more stable, faster and higher-floating. Many paddlers use creekboats in "short boat" downriver races, and they are often seen on large rivers where their extra stability and speed may be necessary to get through rapids.

Contrary to popular belief, the sit-on-top kayak hull is not self bailing, since water penetrating it does not drain out automatically, as it does in bigger boats equipped with self bailing systems. Furthermore, the sit-on-top hull cannot be molded in a way that would assure water tightness, and water may get in through various holes in its hull, usually around hatches and deck accessories. If the sit-on-top kayak is loaded to a point where such perforations are covered with water, or if the water paddled is rough enough that such perforations often go under water, the sit-on-top hull may fill with water without the paddler noticing it in time.
The body of the paddler must also be taken into account. A paddler with a low center of gravity will find all boats more stable; for a paddler with a high center of gravity, all boats will feel tippier. On average, women and children have a lower COG than men.[6][8][9] Unisex kayaks are built for men.[7] A paddler with narrow shoulders will also want a narrower kayak.
Flight San Francisco - Los Angeles (SFO - LAX) $38+ Flight Oakland - Los Angeles (OAK - LAX) $42+ Flight Austin - Los Angeles (AUS - LAX) $97+ Flight Denver - Los Angeles (DEN - LAX) $110+ Flight Houston - Los Angeles (HOU - LAX) $111+ Flight Houston - Los Angeles (IAH - LAX) $111+ Flight Minneapolis - Los Angeles (MSP - LAX) $118+ Flight Dallas - Los Angeles (DFW - LAX) $119+ Flight Seattle - Los Angeles (SEA - LAX) $127+ Flight Chicago - Los Angeles (ORD - LAX) $135+ Flight New York - Los Angeles (LGA - LAX) $135+ Flight Newark - Los Angeles (EWR - LAX) $149+ Flight Washington - Los Angeles (BWI - LAX) $155+ Flight Atlanta - Los Angeles (ATL - LAX) $164+ Flight Philadelphia - Los Angeles (PHL - LAX) $168+ Flight Fort Lauderdale - Los Angeles (FLL - LAX) $175+ Flight Detroit - Los Angeles (DTW - LAX) $178+ Flight Orlando - Los Angeles (MCO - LAX) $178+ Flight Chicago - Los Angeles (MDW - LAX) $186+ Flight Boston - Los Angeles (BOS - LAX) $200+ Flight Washington - Los Angeles (IAD - LAX) $204+ Flight Washington - Los Angeles (DCA - LAX) $204+
Flight Los Angeles - Las Vegas (LAX - LAS) $18+ Flight Oakland - Las Vegas (OAK - LAS) $55+ Flight Seattle - Las Vegas (SEA - LAS) $55+ Flight Dallas - Las Vegas (DFW - LAS) $62+ Flight Denver - Las Vegas (DEN - LAS) $68+ Flight San José - Las Vegas (SJC - LAS) $72+ Flight San Francisco - Las Vegas (SFO - LAS) $82+ Flight Houston - Las Vegas (HOU - LAS) $91+ Flight Houston - Las Vegas (IAH - LAS) $91+ Flight Cleveland - Las Vegas (CLE - LAS) $115+ Flight Detroit - Las Vegas (DTW - LAS) $116+
Flight Denver - Chicago (DEN - ORD) $63+ Flight Dallas - Chicago (DFW - ORD) $97+ Flight Minneapolis - Chicago (MSP - ORD) $97+ Flight Washington - Chicago (BWI - ORD) $106+ Flight Atlanta - Chicago (ATL - ORD) $109+ Flight New York - Chicago (LGA - ORD) $116+ Flight Miami - Chicago (MIA - ORD) $118+ Flight Orlando - Chicago (MCO - ORD) $122+ Flight Los Angeles - Chicago (LAX - ORD) $123+

In the 1740s, Russian explorers led by Vitus Bering came in contact with the Aleutians, who had taken the basic kayak concept and developed multiple designs specifically for hunting, transportation, and environmental conditions. They soon recognized the Aleutians were very skillful at hunting sea otters by kayak. Because otters were a popular commodity in Europe and Asia, they would exploit and even kidnap Aleutians and keep them aboard their ships to work and hunt.[5]
×