Always wanted to learn to kayak or Stand Up Paddleboard, or looking to hone your whitewater paddling skills? Zoar Outdoor, New England’s leader in outdoor adventure, has assembled a team of friendly, professional guides and instructors to help you explore our local lakes and rivers. We offer everything from take-away rentals with minimal guidance so you can set out on your own, up to advanced whitewater instruction programs, and everything in between! Explore all the different options below and start planning your perfect day on the water!
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq, Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᔭᖅ) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood, as many of the areas of their construction were treeless. Archaeologists have found evidence indicating that kayaks are at least 4000 years old.[1] The oldest still existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich.[citation needed]
The appeal of inflatable kayaks is their portability, their durability (they don't dent), ruggedness in white water (they bounce off rocks rather than break) and their easy storage. In addition, inflatable kayaks generally are stable, have a small turning radius and are easy to master, although some models take more effort to paddle and are slower than traditional kayaks.
The Vibe Tribe is full of kayakers and kayak anglers, but more than that, we share a love of doing anything outdoors, from just hanging to every outdoor sport imaginable. On the water or on land, we believe that being in nature makes you a better person. Grab one of our kayaks or SUPs, grab your wakeboard, mountain bike or hiking boots and come out to play. Fill one of our coolers with refreshments, put on some of our gear and get outside. It’s a big world and there’s room for everyone in nature. Good people, good vibes. That’s our Vibe Tribe.
If you are an avid outdoorsman that enjoys boating and kayaking and other such activities, then you may want to be sure that your kayak trailer is capable of hauling a few kayaks at a time, rather than just one. This type of kayak trailer is ideal for a family or a group that happens to be traveling together and they are also designed to be able to carry bikes and other cargo including canoes.
Dimensions will vary depending on which type of boat you select. Long-distance options tend to be between 16 and 19 feet in length. Playboaters who want to do tricks require a highly maneuverable boat that is about 5 to 6 feet long. Boats for use on whitewater rivers are generally around 8 feet in length. A fishing kayak measures between 10 and 13 feet long.
Thanks to Wali for his excerpt from the Idiot’s Guide. How? Poke large hole(s) in your perfectly good Kayak and set it in place with some stick-um and screws. Seriously though, it really is about that simple. A 2 1/4″ hole saw works real well to poke the hole and I like 3m 4200 as a sealant. Don’t drill the screw holes until you put the holder in place and rotate it to the position you want your rod to point in and it fits inside your hull (I shortened mine some). Be careful and don’t over tighten the screws […]
Plan your first few trips to be short and safe. Choose a bright and sunny day that doesn’t have a forecast of rain or high winds to keep your environmental challenges as predictable as possible. Also, know your limits and underestimate the amount of time you can safely kayak before you get fatigued. Like other workouts, you don’t want to overdo your first kayaking trips and make it difficult to paddle back to shore. Limit your first trip to an hour and then extend as you feel comfortable.
Hi there! My name is Matt McKnight and I’m a passionate outdoors guy who enjoys being in the wild and doing many different types of outside activities, such as paddle boarding, kayaking, diving all the way to camping and hiking! I fell in love with the outdoors back when I was a little kid when my dad used to take me on camping trips in our kayak. It has since grown from there and into this site! You can read more about me here

Oru Bay ST folding kayak. Barely used!. Condition is Used.     This a fantastic and ingenious kayak. Very portable and stowable for those with limited space or those that want to travel with their kayak. I have used it maybe 10 times at the most, which is why I am selling it. I have a smaller, cheaper kayak.    I am including the float bags, carry strap, and repair kit. Not sure how I will ship it yet, but I will make sure it gets to you. Kayak is 12' long, 25" wide, 28 lbs. Max capacity of 300 lbs. Very smooth and fast paddling kayak. Great for small lakes to open water.


3) Kayak fishing is distinctly different than fishing from a boat. You must be self-reliant and prepared to handle any situation, on your own. It’s both the beauty and risk associated with the activity. Wear your PFD. There have been a lot of drownings lately due to kayak fisherman going in the drink without flotation. I carry a lot of essential items in my PFD that I need. It’s a tool that I do not fish without. Fishing PFDs have come a long way. These aren’t the 1970’s banana colored, camp lifejackets.

One of the great things about whitewater kayaking is making friends who share your passion. Running the rapids with a friend or a crew of adventure buddies is not only more fun; it’s safer. Whitewater kayaking is essentially risky, so you want to go in groups in case anyone is injured. However, the logistics of shuttling multiple boats to and from the put-in and the take-out point can be quite challenging and time consuming.
Browse our inventory of many industry leading brands, including Pelican International, Perception, Wilderness Systems, Hobie and much more. To personalize your search, filter by brand, price and activity to find the perfect kayak right here online, or shop kayaks in person from one of our many SCHEELS locations. No matter which route you choose, you can be sure to find an excellent selection of high-performing products to meet your needs and skill level. Shop SCHEELS kayaks to kick start your season of adventure.
The Yakima Rack and Roll Trailer has a shock absorbing system that’s the same style as a full sized motorcycle, making the ride smoother for your kayaks and them less likely to be damaged by any of the bumps or knocks that come with any road trip. Because the cross bars are compatible with any Yakima product (and others, if the reviews are to be believed; though they don’t advertise that), you can use this for more than your kayaks, too. You can even secure a cargo carrier next to your kayak, or a bike or two! (Just be careful on the weight.)
Flight Fort Lauderdale - Newark (FLL - EWR) $57+ Flight Chicago - New York (ORD - LGA) $117+ Flight Fort Lauderdale - New York (FLL - LGA) $123+ Flight Atlanta - Newark (ATL - EWR) $124+ Flight Chicago - New York (ORD - JFK) $127+ Flight Los Angeles - New York (LAX - LGA) $142+ Flight Chicago - Newark (ORD - EWR) $147+ Flight Miami - New York (MIA - JFK) $166+ Flight Houston - Newark (HOU - EWR) $185+ Flight Houston - New York (HOU - LGA) $186+ Flight Atlanta - New York (ATL - JFK) $187+ Flight Dallas - New York (DFW - LGA) $189+ Flight San Francisco - New York (SFO - LGA) $210+ Flight Oakland - New York (OAK - LGA) $212+ Flight Dallas - Newark (DFW - EWR) $221+ Flight Los Angeles - Newark (LAX - EWR) $230+ Flight Ontario - New York (ONT - JFK) $237+ Flight Los Angeles - New York (LAX - JFK) $251+ Flight San Francisco - Newark (SFO - EWR) $251+ Flight San José - New York (SJC - JFK) $251+ Flight San Francisco - New York (SFO - JFK) $255+ Flight Oakland - New York (OAK - JFK) $263+ Flight Seattle - New York (SEA - JFK) $269+ Flight Oakland - Newark (OAK - EWR) $294+
Kayaking can be a relaxing experience as you leisurely paddle out to the center of your favorite lake and enjoy the soothing serenity of nature. Kayaking can also be an adrenaline-filled ride as you test your skills on a river swelling with whitewater rapids. Though both activities offer completely different expectations of fun, all forms of kayaking pose safety hazards.

Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq, Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᔭᖅ) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood, as many of the areas of their construction were treeless. Archaeologists have found evidence indicating that kayaks are at least 4000 years old.[1] The oldest still existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich.[citation needed]
FishUSA now offers fishing kayaks, which are designed from the water up for anglers and their equipment. These modern kayaks differ from the original hunting kayaks of the Arctic in many ways. Instead of stretching skins or other material over an internal frame, modern kayaks are roto-molded in durable plastics. Polyethylene resins are used to make a hard, hollow shell to support the angler, as well as a wide range of accessories, while also being a bit flexible and impact resistant. Modern fishing kayaks typically do not feature an enclosed compartment like their predecessors did. Due to the physical actions of paddling a low-profile boat while needing access to all equipment at a moment’s notice, the standard design referred to as “sit-on-top” is the preferred style for fishing kayaks. The angler sits on top of the hollow shell which is designed to be in contact with the lower back, legs and feet of the paddler to gain maneuverability while remaining stable. Built-in dry storage compartments and other features allow for storage of tackle, provisions and other items you would want to keep dry. Some fishing kayaks even have live bait compartments built right into the shell.

Contemporary kayaks can be equipped with after-market fishing accessories such as anchor trolleys, rod holders, electronic fish-finders and live-bait containers. Kayak anglers target highly prized gamefish like snook, red drum, seatrout, tarpon, halibut and cod and also pelagics like amberjacks, tuna, sailfish, wahoo, king mackerel, and even marlin.
Fishing kayaks can be extra tricky to load on top of a typical car rack. Most kayak anglers use a kayak trailer. Kayak trailers make it easy to get your kayak to the water and at the end of the day when you are tired, it is easy to load back up and get home. A kayak trailer can also save you money in terms of gas mileage and fuel efficiency when compared to loading and hauling your kayaks on the rooftop.
While native people of the Arctic regions hunted rather than fished from kayaks, in recent years kayak sport fishing has become popular in both fresh and salt water, especially in warmer regions. Traditional fishing kayaks are characterized by wide beams of up to 42 inches (110 cm) that increase their lateral stability. Some are equipped with outriggers that increase their stability, and others feature twin hulls enabling stand up paddling and fishing. Compared with motorboats, fishing kayaks are inexpensive and have few maintenance costs. Many kayak anglers like to customize their kayaks for fishing, a process known as 'rigging'.
Folding kayaks are direct descendants of the skin-on-frame boats used by the Inuit and Greenlandic peoples. Modern folding kayaks are constructed from a wooden or aluminum frame over which is placed a synthetic skin made of polyester, cotton canvas, polyurethane, or Hypalon. They are more expensive than inflatable kayaks, but have the advantage of greater stiffness and consequently better seaworthiness.
Paddle: A paddle is as essential as the kayak itself. When choosing paddles, you’ll need to consider the measurement of your torso and the width of kayak you’ll be paddling. There are sizing charts available but generally, torso heights over 28 inches will use paddle lengths of 200 centimeters and above, torso heights under 28 inches will use paddle lengths under 200 centimeters.
A chine typically increases secondary stability by effectively widening the beam of the boat when it heels (tips). A V-shaped hull tends to travel straight (track) well, but makes turning harder. V-shaped hulls also have the greatest secondary stability. Conversely, flat-bottomed hulls are easy to turn, but harder to direct in a constant direction. A round-bottomed boat has minimal wetter area, and thus minimizes drag; however, it may be so unstable that it will not remain upright when floating empty, and needs continual effort to keep it upright. In a skin-on-frame kayak, chine placement may be constrained by the need to avoid the bones of the pelvis.[14]
Plan your first few trips to be short and safe. Choose a bright and sunny day that doesn’t have a forecast of rain or high winds to keep your environmental challenges as predictable as possible. Also, know your limits and underestimate the amount of time you can safely kayak before you get fatigued. Like other workouts, you don’t want to overdo your first kayaking trips and make it difficult to paddle back to shore. Limit your first trip to an hour and then extend as you feel comfortable.
Thankfully, many docking systems built today can easily accommodate kayakers of all abilities and skill levels. Our passion for spending time on the water has led us to create floating kayak launch systems to make getting in and out of the water a breeze. Our EZ Launch System and EZ Launch Accessible Transfer System features launch rollers, guide rails and an adjustable floating platform that caters to the needs of all ages and abilities, meaning you can launch (and dock) your kayak with total confidence anytime.
Unique to all the sites that followed, anglers can still reach a guide (or pro-staffer) directly through Kayakfishing.com.  By phone, email or text.   A handful of kayak fishing experts, including writers, guides and exceptionally talented kayak anglers in all the fisheries, have been fielding inquiries from anglers for 20 years.  Ranging from “Which kayak should I buy” to “Which knot should I tie…..and a lot of “How do I catch ________”, it’s a great way to meet kayak anglers and we look forward to hooking up with you anytime.
Typically most kayak trailers have a capacity of around two to four different kayaks at a time. The manufacturer should have a recommendation and a maximum capacity rating for the trailer. This criteria alone will give you a better idea for what you need.  Some of these trailers can potentially be used as multi purpose transportation for other things such as paddle boards, bikes, canoes or even boats depending on it’s capacity.
Yes…..You can install the CKF Paddle Clips on the Prowler and other “rounded” kayaks by flexing the base to conform to the hull. Stainless nuts and bolts are recommended when access to the interior is afforded. Snug the paddle clip base down gradually alternating back and forth between each fastener. Stainless sheet metal screws or rivets will work when a “blind” fastener is needed. The Paddle Clips should be installed at room temperature or warmer for an easy application.

I decided to try kayak fishing. I’d fished as a kid, on occasion as a teen, but hadn’t done much in my adult life. So I started casting lines from a used kayak in April of 2013. I got into kayak fishing thinking that it would be a good marketing angle, to pick up some skills, and to relate to that portion of the paddle-sports market. I also thought it wouldn’t hurt to appeal to the larger fishing market. I had no idea that this motivation would quickly turn into an absolute obsession, and that within me lay dormant a passion that exploded with that first cast and that first kayak caught bass.


A: Most kayaks aren’t meant to be locked onto a trailer. You can attach a lock to the strapping system found on most kayak trailers but this will only slow down people looking to steal your gear. This can be ok for a short term stop but we strongly suggest that you don’t leave your car unattended with anything on your trailer. You should do your shopping and prepare for the trip beforehand.
Use Google Earth or other online sources to scout out small non-motor lakes, streams and rivers. One of the best things about kayak fishing is the ability to get on water that isn’t crowded with boaters. Pay attention to where ramp and entry points are located, as well as where some prime fishing spots may be. Doing this will help you save time, stay safe and will increase your chances of catching some fish!
You may also want to pick up a kayak trailer if you’re thinking long-term. If you have a lifestyle that lends to adventure, then its reasonable to assume you’ll make friends or build a family that will join you kayaking. It’s not a bad idea to pick a trailer up before you build that family because you’ll probably better be able to afford it. And, to put it a way that will appeal to your self-interest: if you’re the person that has the kayak trailer, you’re pretty much guaranteed invites for excursions.
You can kayak in any body of water: Our wonderful world is full of diverse environments which can be explored from the seat of your kayak. With portable equipment that can be easily launched from any dock, riverside or shore, your kayak can travel with you to some of the most beautiful destinations in the world. River, lakes, oceans and more — your possibilities for exploring are endless.
A: Most kayaks aren’t meant to be locked onto a trailer. You can attach a lock to the strapping system found on most kayak trailers but this will only slow down people looking to steal your gear. This can be ok for a short term stop but we strongly suggest that you don’t leave your car unattended with anything on your trailer. You should do your shopping and prepare for the trip beforehand.
A: While many people mistakenly think that only big trucks and SUVs can tow a loaded kayak trailer, this isn’t the truth. Any vehicle that is equipped with a tow package can pull a trailer. It is important to look into the weight rating that your vehicle can tow as well as the hitch rating. Be sure to not only take into account how heavy the trailer is but also the weight of the trailer fully loaded with kayaks.
Although cumbersome, anchors definitely have a place in the kayak fishing arsenal. This is particularly true on lakes when it’s windy, or in areas offshore where you want to stay in one particular area. For most kayak models, a 2-4 pound claw anchor is more than sufficient. Be careful anchoring in current though, as if something were to happen, the current can actually push the whole boat under water. Most river kayakers use a quick release clevis on their anchors, if they anchor at all.
Hi there! My name is Matt McKnight and I’m a passionate outdoors guy who enjoys being in the wild and doing many different types of outside activities, such as paddle boarding, kayaking, diving all the way to camping and hiking! I fell in love with the outdoors back when I was a little kid when my dad used to take me on camping trips in our kayak. It has since grown from there and into this site! You can read more about me here
When it’s windy, or when paddling up-current, it takes a lot of effort to make any headway, much less fish. In these situations, use the minimal draft of your kayak to your advantage. Instead of paddling right down the middle of the river or lake, get as shallow as you can. The current is much less in super skinny water, and wind and waves are also mitigated by shoreline vegetation and structures, you’ll paddle more efficiently, and you’re going to have much more energy once you get to your honey hole.
Stitch & Glue designs typically use modern, marine-grade plywood — eighth-inch, 3 millimetres (0.12 in) or up to quarter-inch, 5 millimetres (0.20 in) thick. After cutting out the required pieces of hull and deck (kits often have these pre-cut), a series of small holes are drilled along the edges. Copper wire is then used to "stitch" the pieces together through the holes. After the pieces are temporarily stitched together, they are glued with epoxy and the seams reinforced with fiberglass. When the epoxy dries, the copper stitches are removed. Sometimes the entire boat is then covered in fiberglass for additional strength and waterproofing though this adds greatly to the weight and is unnecessary. Construction is fairly straightforward, but because plywood does not bend to form compound curves, design choices are limited. This is a good choice for the first-time kayak builder as the labor and skills required (especially for kit versions) is considerably less than for strip-built boats which can take 3 times as long to build.
×