FOR THE PERSON THAT HAS MORE THAN 1 CANOE, KAYAK OR SMALL BOAT. THIS UNIT HAS 250 POUND CAPACITY AND WILL HOLD 2 CANOES OR UP TO 4 KAYAKS. IT HAS ADJUSTABLE 72" WIDE CROSSBARS (FRONT TO REAR) AND A FULLY ADJUSTABLE AXLE, FOR TONGUE WEIGHT. ADJUSTABLE TIE DOWN LOOPS (6) ARE ALSO STANDARD. THE PERFECT "FAMILY TRAILER". IT IS 14' 11" LONG AND 72" WIDE (AT THE CROSSBARS). 1 7/8" BALL COUPLER
A chine typically increases secondary stability by effectively widening the beam of the boat when it heels (tips). A V-shaped hull tends to travel straight (track) well, but makes turning harder. V-shaped hulls also have the greatest secondary stability. Conversely, flat-bottomed hulls are easy to turn, but harder to direct in a constant direction. A round-bottomed boat has minimal wetter area, and thus minimizes drag; however, it may be so unstable that it will not remain upright when floating empty, and needs continual effort to keep it upright. In a skin-on-frame kayak, chine placement may be constrained by the need to avoid the bones of the pelvis.[14]
^ There is scant evidence of Ainu peoples using the classic kayak design in prehistoric times. The following indicates that they did use skin-covered vessels, however: "Like the yara chisei, bark houses, … yara chip, bark boats, were probably substitutes for the skin-covered boat, elsewhere surviving in the coracle and kayak. Skin-covered boats … are referred to in old [Ainu] traditions. -Ainu material culture from the notes of N. G. Munro: in the archive of the Royal Anthropological Institute, British Museum, Department of Ethnography, 1994, p. 33
Are you ready to get out onto the water and begin your kayaking adventures? At EZ Dock, we’re confident that with a little practice, you’ll be on your way to mastering your new hobby. We want to help make your kayaking experience as smooth as possible with our residential kayak launches. Unlike wooden docks, our EZ Kayak Launch won’t splinter or peel and is durable enough to endure extreme weather conditions.
Kickstand. If you’re shopping for a hand trailer that you’ll be operating by (obviously) hand, you will want to look into the ease of use and one of the biggest operating conveniences is a kickstand. By utilizing a kickstand (like with your bike) you’ll be able to take your hands off your kayak without it falling to the ground. That means you can run to the bathroom, get your life vest on, or just high-five your bro without damaging your kayak.
Native builders designed and built their boats based on their own experience and that of the generations before them, passed on through oral tradition. The word "kayak" means "man's boat" or "hunter's boat", and native kayaks were a personal craft, each built by the man who used it—with assistance from his wife, who sewed the skins—[dubious – discuss]and closely fitting his size for maximum maneuverability. The paddler wore a tuilik, a garment that was stretched over the rim of the kayak coaming, and sealed with drawstrings at the coaming, wrists, and hood edges. This enabled the "eskimo roll" and rescue to become the preferred methods of recovery after capsizing, especially as few Inuit could swim; their waters are too cold for a swimmer to survive for long.[4]
Contemporary traditional-style kayaks trace their origins primarily to the native boats of Alaska, northern Canada, and Southwest Greenland. Wooden kayaks and fabric kayaks on wooden frames dominated the market up until the 1950s, when fiberglass boats were first introduced in the US, and inflatable rubberized fabric boats were first introduced in Europe. Rotomolded plastic kayaks first appeared in 1973, and most kayaks today are made from roto-molded polyethylene resins. The development of plastic and rubberized inflatable kayaks arguably initiated the development of freestyle kayaking as we see it today, since these boats could be made smaller, stronger and more resilient than fiberglass boats.

Strip-built designs are similar in shape to rigid fiberglass kayaks but are generally both lighter and tougher. Like their fiberglass counterparts the shape and size of the boat determines performance and optimal uses. The hull and deck are built with thin strips of lightweight wood, often cedar, pine or Redwood. The strips are edge-glued together around a form, stapled or clamped in place, and allowed to dry. Structural strength comes from a layer of fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin, layered inside and outside the hull. Strip–built kayaks are sold commercially by a few companies, priced USD 4,000 and up. An experienced woodworker can build one for about USD 400 in 200 hours, though the exact cost and time depend on the builder's skill, the materials and the size and design. As a second kayak project, or for the serious builder with some woodworking expertise, a strip–built boat can be an impressive piece of work. Kits with pre-cut and milled wood strips are commercially available.

River and Trail Outfitters provides quality kayaks & canoes and the widest variety of rental trips on the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers as well as Antietam Creek. For novice kayaking and canoeing, there are scenic mellow water trips featuring beautiful scenery and wildlife. For more experienced boaters, there are a variety of beginner to intermediate whitewater runs in and around Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.

The Yakima Rack and Roll Trailer has a shock absorbing system that’s the same style as a full sized motorcycle, making the ride smoother for your kayaks and them less likely to be damaged by any of the bumps or knocks that come with any road trip. Because the cross bars are compatible with any Yakima product (and others, if the reviews are to be believed; though they don’t advertise that), you can use this for more than your kayaks, too. You can even secure a cargo carrier next to your kayak, or a bike or two! (Just be careful on the weight.)


Just like the one handed cast, efficient kayak angling requires skill in handling a paddle with one hand. Paddling a kayak is simple with two hands, as the rhythm comes easily to even the least experienced of anglers. But what do you do when you’re fighting a fish with one hand, and you’ve got to steer your boat back upstream to get on the other side of a laydown or avoid an overhanging branch? Practice locking the shaft of your paddle along a forearm, which anchors it along your arm, and allows you to use it more like a canoe paddle.

Native builders designed and built their boats based on their own experience and that of the generations before them, passed on through oral tradition. The word "kayak" means "man's boat" or "hunter's boat", and native kayaks were a personal craft, each built by the man who used it—with assistance from his wife, who sewed the skins—[dubious – discuss]and closely fitting his size for maximum maneuverability. The paddler wore a tuilik, a garment that was stretched over the rim of the kayak coaming, and sealed with drawstrings at the coaming, wrists, and hood edges. This enabled the "eskimo roll" and rescue to become the preferred methods of recovery after capsizing, especially as few Inuit could swim; their waters are too cold for a swimmer to survive for long.[4]
While you should always exercise caution when engaging in any watersport or physical activity, kayaking can be a safe and fun experience as long as you practice it safely. Always pack your essential gear, understand the conditions of the weather and water and make every attempt to act as responsibly as possible. Remember — the safe kayaking is smart kayaking.
The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. The cockpit is sometimes covered by a spray deck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray, differentiating the craft from a canoe. The spray deck makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler.
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