Every single kayak trailer has a maximum weight rating. If you already have a kayak it’s important to check it’s weight as to not exceed the trailers limit. The average kayak will weigh around 40 lbs while the typical single large kayak trailer can be be rated for a weight of about 200 lbs. If you exceed the limit you can risk it breaking in transit.
Before you learn how to ride in a kayak, you first need to learn how to get in and out of a kayak. Getting in and out of a kayak can be tricky, but we’re confident that after a little practice, you’ll catch on quickly. Put simply, there are two different ways which you will likely enter a kayak — getting into a kayak on land or in shallow depths of water, or getting into one that’s already in deeper water. Both options have their advantages and challenges.
Getting into your kayak from the shore is much easier, especially for those who are learning to kayak. Whether it’s a lakeside, sea shore or riverfront, the best way to begin is to move the kayak as close to the shoreline as possible. You can then sit in the kayak and use your arms to push yourself into the water until you are floating on the surface. If you’re concerned about scratching your hull on the ground, move the kayak into the shallow water and climb in there.
Multiple kayak space. As we mentioned a few times, you may want to plan ahead for multiple kayaks, even if you only have one now. If for no other reason than you can better accommodate your own trips. After all, adventures are often enjoyed better with a partner. Not to mention the fact that having an adventure buddy makes your outing more safe. Should the worst happen, you’ll be grateful you have someone there with you; it could save your life. (And with that safety net of another person, you can get into more adventurous adventures.)
Keep in mind that due to the additional weight, your vehicle will drive differently. You will need to remember to go slower than normal and take wide turns. It’s also important for your vehicle to have good brakes, especially when traveling on highways. If you don’t feel your car can handle the extra weight we strongly recommend you get them looked at before adding the weight of a trailer and kayak.
Although I wanted the basic trailer when I first contacted the company, I’m now glad I upgraded to one of the utility bed models. Rather than stuffing my small SUV with pedal drives, gear crates, seats, paddles and fishing tackle, I now bungee stuff beneath my kayaks. It speeds up loading, and I can rinse the salt off my kayaks and fishing gear simultaneously. Transporting salty accessories on the trailer also protects the interior of my SUV from corrosion. After hosing everything off, I just back the loaded trailer into the garage, keeping my kayaks and gear secure overnight, ready for the morning fishing trip. The bed design prevents pooling water, so gear dries quickly and very little water drips on my garage floor. [ read the entire review here 10/6/17 ]
Native builders designed and built their boats based on their own experience and that of the generations before them, passed on through oral tradition. The word "kayak" means "man's boat" or "hunter's boat", and native kayaks were a personal craft, each built by the man who used it—with assistance from his wife, who sewed the skins—[dubious – discuss]and closely fitting his size for maximum maneuverability. The paddler wore a tuilik, a garment that was stretched over the rim of the kayak coaming, and sealed with drawstrings at the coaming, wrists, and hood edges. This enabled the "eskimo roll" and rescue to become the preferred methods of recovery after capsizing, especially as few Inuit could swim; their waters are too cold for a swimmer to survive for long.[4]
While native people of the Arctic regions hunted rather than fished from kayaks, in recent years kayak sport fishing has become popular in both fresh and salt water, especially in warmer regions. Traditional fishing kayaks are characterized by wide beams of up to 42 inches (110 cm) that increase their lateral stability. Some are equipped with outriggers that increase their stability, and others feature twin hulls enabling stand up paddling and fishing. Compared with motorboats, fishing kayaks are inexpensive and have few maintenance costs. Many kayak anglers like to customize their kayaks for fishing, a process known as 'rigging'.
The instructions for how you get out of a kayak are easy to remember — just complete the steps in reverse. When exiting on the shore, paddle your kayak into shallow water or as close to the land as possible. Swing your legs out of the kayak, gain your footing and stand up. When exiting the kayak on a dock, turn your body to face the dock and pull yourself out of the kayak.
Before you learn how to ride in a kayak, you first need to learn how to get in and out of a kayak. Getting in and out of a kayak can be tricky, but we’re confident that after a little practice, you’ll catch on quickly. Put simply, there are two different ways which you will likely enter a kayak — getting into a kayak on land or in shallow depths of water, or getting into one that’s already in deeper water. Both options have their advantages and challenges.
Traditional kayaks encompass three types: Baidarkas, from the Bering sea & Aleutian islands, the oldest design, whose rounded shape and numerous chines give them an almost Blimp-like appearance; West Greenland kayaks, with fewer chines and a more angular shape, with gunwales rising to a point at the bow and stern; and East Greenland kayaks that appear similar to the West Greenland style, but often fit more snugly to the paddler and possess a steeper angle between gunwale and stem, which lends maneuverability.
3) Kayak fishing is distinctly different than fishing from a boat. You must be self-reliant and prepared to handle any situation, on your own. It’s both the beauty and risk associated with the activity. Wear your PFD. There have been a lot of drownings lately due to kayak fisherman going in the drink without flotation. I carry a lot of essential items in my PFD that I need. It’s a tool that I do not fish without. Fishing PFDs have come a long way. These aren’t the 1970’s banana colored, camp lifejackets.

The Yakima Rack and Roll Trailer has a shock absorbing system that’s the same style as a full sized motorcycle, making the ride smoother for your kayaks and them less likely to be damaged by any of the bumps or knocks that come with any road trip. Because the cross bars are compatible with any Yakima product (and others, if the reviews are to be believed; though they don’t advertise that), you can use this for more than your kayaks, too. You can even secure a cargo carrier next to your kayak, or a bike or two! (Just be careful on the weight.)


Whitewater kayaks are rotomolded in a semi-rigid, high impact plastic, usually polyethylene. Careful construction ensures that the boat remains structurally sound when subjected to fast-moving water. The plastic hull allows these kayaks to bounce off rocks without leaking, although they scratch and eventually puncture with enough use. Whitewater kayaks range from 4 to 10 feet (1.2 to 3.0 m) long. There are two main types of whitewater kayak:

You can kayak in any body of water: Our wonderful world is full of diverse environments which can be explored from the seat of your kayak. With portable equipment that can be easily launched from any dock, riverside or shore, your kayak can travel with you to some of the most beautiful destinations in the world. River, lakes, oceans and more — your possibilities for exploring are endless.


If you are an avid outdoorsman that enjoys boating and kayaking and other such activities, then you may want to be sure that your kayak trailer is capable of hauling a few kayaks at a time, rather than just one. This type of kayak trailer is ideal for a family or a group that happens to be traveling together and they are also designed to be able to carry bikes and other cargo including canoes.
A fishfinder allows you to see a graphic representation of what’s beneath your fishing kayak, so you can identify fish. To choose a fishfinder, consider the type of unit—whether it includes GPS or not, the size of the fishfinder’s footprint, the resolution of the display, how much transmitting power you need and what frequencies will work best in the inland or coastal environments where you fish.
“I just wanted to drop you a quick line and say, “thanks” for your outstanding customer service. It’s been almost exactly one year since I purchased my Perception kayak from you guys (and gals), and I’ve had a BLAST with it from the moment I brought it home. I’ve been back a time or two to pick up some additional gear and again, you all were great! … Your 1 year 10% discount kept me coming back for more. As a matter of fact, I’ve even sent some friends down who have all purchased kayaks and been just as pleased with their service and products. Keep up the great work and I hope to see you soon!” 

Flight Boston - London (BOS - LHR) $259+ Flight Boston - London (BOS - LGW) $312+ Flight New York - London (JFK - LGW) $328+ Flight Newark - London (EWR - LGW) $347+ Flight Newark - London (EWR - LHR) $348+ Flight New York - London (JFK - LHR) $357+ Flight New York - London (LGA - LHR) $372+ Flight Newark - London (EWR - STN) $373+ Flight San Francisco - London (SFO - LGW) $381+ Flight Chicago - London (ORD - LHR) $389+ Flight Chicago - London (ORD - LGW) $390+ Flight Los Angeles - London (LAX - LGW) $395+ Flight San Francisco - London (SFO - LHR) $396+ Flight Newark - London (EWR - LCY) $401+
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq, Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᔭᖅ) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood, as many of the areas of their construction were treeless. Archaeologists have found evidence indicating that kayaks are at least 4000 years old.[1] The oldest still existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich.[citation needed]
Recreational kayaks are designed for the casual paddler interested in fishing, photography, or a peaceful paddle on a lake, flatwater stream or protected salt water away from strong ocean waves. These boats presently make up the largest segment of kayak sales. Compared to other kayaks, recreational kayaks have a larger cockpit for easier entry and exit and a wider beam (27–36 inches (69–91 cm)) for more stability. They are generally less than 12 feet (3.7 m) in length and have limited cargo capacity. Less expensive materials like polyethylene and fewer options keep these boats relatively inexpensive. Most canoe/kayak clubs offer introductory instruction in recreational boats. They do not perform as well in the sea. The recreational kayak is usually a type of touring kayak.

If you are an avid outdoorsman that enjoys boating and kayaking and other such activities, then you may want to be sure that your kayak trailer is capable of hauling a few kayaks at a time, rather than just one. This type of kayak trailer is ideal for a family or a group that happens to be traveling together and they are also designed to be able to carry bikes and other cargo including canoes.
When it’s windy, or when paddling up-current, it takes a lot of effort to make any headway, much less fish. In these situations, use the minimal draft of your kayak to your advantage. Instead of paddling right down the middle of the river or lake, get as shallow as you can. The current is much less in super skinny water, and wind and waves are also mitigated by shoreline vegetation and structures, you’ll paddle more efficiently, and you’re going to have much more energy once you get to your honey hole.

One guide stays with the group in a support kayak, while another trails nearby in a Zodiac just in case of emergencies that require a faster retreat back to the main ship. All of our guides are experts in kayaking and have a great deal of experience working with groups just like yours. They will work to scale an excursion to the skill-level of your group.Kayak fun © Oliver Richter-Oceanwide ExpeditionsDo I have to bring any of my own kayaking equipment?We provide the kayaks (5 single-seat and 5 double-seat Perception Horizon II and Perception Sea Yaks), the paddles, Neoprene wetsuits, splash shirts and spray covers, Neoprene booties and caps, and a life-jacket/kayak vest (Palm). You do however want to make sure you’re dressed properly for your excursion in the open Polar air. So you’ll need to bring along your own:
When it’s windy, or when paddling up-current, it takes a lot of effort to make any headway, much less fish. In these situations, use the minimal draft of your kayak to your advantage. Instead of paddling right down the middle of the river or lake, get as shallow as you can. The current is much less in super skinny water, and wind and waves are also mitigated by shoreline vegetation and structures, you’ll paddle more efficiently, and you’re going to have much more energy once you get to your honey hole.
The TMS CART-CANOE Deluxe Kayak Carrier is made with aluminum pipes, and reinforced with anodized stainless steel so your trailer is a lightweight one with added durability. The tires are a durable solid 9.5″ in diameter and handle grass, gravel, and sand well, so taking this to the beach is a breeze. And the no-air feature means you won’t need to refill tires in between uses.
 Do I need to be an experienced kayaker? How physically fit should I be?The amount of experience that we ask that you have depends on the cruise you choose. If you have no experience at all then we’d suggest one of our Basecamp voyages where we’ll happily introduce even the most inexperienced kayakers to this wonderful new experience.Kayaking in Spitsbergen © Pete Gwatkin-Oceanwide Expeditions
These manufacturers offer special models for fishing that are designed and accessorized for this sport, including specially designed hatches, built-in coolers & rod holders, gps receivers and equipment mounts. Other accessories include live wells, anchor trolleys and running lights. Specially designed fishing kayaks usually have designs similar to those of recreational sit-in and sit-on-top kayaks characterized by very wide beams (up to 36 inches) that increase lateral stability. The increases stability allows for the angler to stand up and fish on the kayak. These kayaks provide a considerable space for storage inside their hulls which allow the angler to stow rods, fishing gear, batteries for fish finders, extra paddles, anchors, and wheels to tow the kayak from vehicle to the water. The cutouts molded into the top of the kayaks are well-suited to hold milk crates with additional supplies. Some anglers equip their fishing kayaks with outriggers to further increase stability.[3] In recent years people have begun using kayaks for fly fishing, most models suited for upright fly casting include upright braces that allow you to safely stand up.[4]

You can kayak virtually anywhere in the world with a large enough body of water. Unlike some other vessels, you can strap a kayak to the roof of your car and head out on a new adventure. You can explore calm lakes, river rapids, quiet creeks and serene seas. One of the greatest advantages of kayaking is you can have an exciting journey across the water both near and far. Here are just a few destinations where we suggest you remember to pack your paddle:
Hoping Everyone had a Happy Holiday Season and Wishing You A Very Fishy Year in 2019!!! Come January, while many fisheries are gearing up for next season pursuits like striped bass or waiting for various fisheries to open, others appreciate winter targets.  Northern fishing lodges are long shuttered and somebody somewhere’s out there checking the ice.  Thinking back on the years, it’s clear that kayaks make the season longer for most fisheries where you don’t need an ice hut.  Beyond the Golden State, I’m seeing a lot of nice action along the Gulf for redfish and it appears, kayak bass fishing never […]
A hand trailer is one that you will push or pull yourself. It’s intended to get your kayak into the water with ease. For example, a more popular spot to put into the river will often have substantial traffic and backing your truck into the “loading zone” will likely not be possible. (Especially if the river has a bit of a drop off, like most do). You will likely park a bit of a trek from the water and getting your kayak there will be all the easier of you have a portable conveyance that will allow you to roll the kayak to the water. A bike trailer is often one that will operate as a hand trailer, but also attach to your bike so that you can travel greater distances. If you plan on biking to your destination to start your kayaking trek, then you’ll want to look into a bike trailer that will also allow you to operate it as a hand trailer, too.
Breaking this down into the two most important sections it’s important to first question whether your mechanical skills are up to putting this together. After you make your purchase you will have a ton of large steel filled heavy boxes delivered to your door. You must really ask yourself: do you have space, time and understanding to put this together on your own? If not installed correctly this can end up costing you a lot of money and be incredibly dangerous for you when on the road.

It does this by its marine grade pre-galvanized frame which is also rust resistant. This is ideal for those who venture into the ocean as you will not have to worry about corrosion. Even their wheels are galvanized so you can drive the trailer right into to the water. This means that you will no longer have to haul your kayak in and out of the water. Malone even includes a spare tire for you which will help keep you safe. You will find that this package even includes J-style kayak saddles to make attaching your kayaks even easier. This user friendly package comes with clear instructions to make building this trailer easier.
Fiberglass hulls are stiffer than polyethylene hulls, but they are more prone to damage from impact, including cracking. Most modern kayaks have steep V sections at the bow and stern, and a shallow V amidships. Fiberglass kayaks need to be "laid-up" in a mold by hand, so are usually more expensive than polyethylene kayaks, which are rotationally molded in a machine.
×