Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq (ᖃᔭᖅ Inuktitut pronunciation: [qɑˈjɑq]), Yup'ik: qayaq (from qai- "surface; top"),[2] Aleut: Iqyax) were originally developed by the Inuit, Yup'ik, and Aleut. They used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched seal or other animal skins stretched over a wood or whalebone-skeleton frame. (Western Alaskan Natives used wood whereas the eastern Inuit used whalebone due to the treeless landscape). Kayaks are believed to be at least 4,000 years old. The oldest existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich, with the oldest dating from 1577.[3]

One type, the playboat, is short, with a scooped bow and blunt stern. These trade speed and stability for high maneuverability. Their primary use is performing tricks in individual water features or short stretches of river. In playboating or freestyle competition (also known as rodeo boating), kayakers exploit the complex currents of rapids to execute a series of tricks, which are scored for skill and style.


The next question you should ask yourself is whether or not you have the tools needed to assemble your trailer. If you do not, most tools can easily be rented from local hardware stores that will help you get what you need. Keep in mind the cost of these rentals though. In some cases, it can cost as much to rent the tools needed to install it than it does to simply buy a pre-assembled unit.

Flight Los Angeles - Las Vegas (LAX - LAS) $18+ Flight Oakland - Las Vegas (OAK - LAS) $55+ Flight Seattle - Las Vegas (SEA - LAS) $55+ Flight Dallas - Las Vegas (DFW - LAS) $62+ Flight Denver - Las Vegas (DEN - LAS) $68+ Flight San José - Las Vegas (SJC - LAS) $72+ Flight San Francisco - Las Vegas (SFO - LAS) $82+ Flight Houston - Las Vegas (HOU - LAS) $91+ Flight Houston - Las Vegas (IAH - LAS) $91+ Flight Cleveland - Las Vegas (CLE - LAS) $115+ Flight Detroit - Las Vegas (DTW - LAS) $116+
This might seem weird, but you’d be surprised how often experienced kayak anglers use their feet in some way while fishing. If your boat is narrow enough, you can actually use them as rudders to steer your drift on rivers, and they work as great anchors when fishing rip rap, laydowns, and other shallow areas – simply stick a foot out and hold on to the log until you’re done fishing the hole. Feet are also great for re-directing the boat from a stump, log, or other obstacle while your hands are busy fighting a fish.
Before getting into the water, all beginners should first learn how to handle the paddle.The part of the paddle you hold is called the shaft. The proper way to hold a paddle is to place your hands slightly farther than shoulder width apart on the shaft. Oftentimes, one mistake that beginner kayakers make is holding the paddle incorrectly. One side of the blade is concave and should always be facing you. Slice the paddle blade vertically into the water, keeping a relaxed grip on the shaft with your knuckles pointed upward. Keeping this form will put more power into your paddle without exerting more energy.
Flight Denver - Chicago (DEN - ORD) $63+ Flight Dallas - Chicago (DFW - ORD) $97+ Flight Minneapolis - Chicago (MSP - ORD) $97+ Flight Washington - Chicago (BWI - ORD) $106+ Flight Atlanta - Chicago (ATL - ORD) $109+ Flight New York - Chicago (LGA - ORD) $116+ Flight Miami - Chicago (MIA - ORD) $118+ Flight Orlando - Chicago (MCO - ORD) $122+ Flight Los Angeles - Chicago (LAX - ORD) $123+

The Trinity River is home to some of the most spectacular and awe-inspiring scenery in all of Texas. The river and its surroundings house countless wonders that few take the advantage of seeing. All along the river, you can find a wide assortment of wildlife. From beavers to hawks, one of our fishing kayak trips provides a nice getaway from the Dallas city life.
Although cumbersome, anchors definitely have a place in the kayak fishing arsenal. This is particularly true on lakes when it’s windy, or in areas offshore where you want to stay in one particular area. For most kayak models, a 2-4 pound claw anchor is more than sufficient. Be careful anchoring in current though, as if something were to happen, the current can actually push the whole boat under water. Most river kayakers use a quick release clevis on their anchors, if they anchor at all.
Nearly all trailers can haul more than one kayak. This is a great way to transport your friend’s or family’s kayak. When hauling more than one kayak it’s important to ensure your vehicle is able to handle that much weight. Keep in mind that you not only have to factor in the weight of the kayaks but also the weight of the trailer and any other gear strapped to the trailer.
You can strap virtually anything to a car given the right gear and thorough enough straps. The most efficient way would be to buy specialized kayak racks intended for strapping your kayak to your car. But you can strap your kayak (or two, but probably not more than two safely) with just the roof rack and cross bars. Without the cross bars, you’ll certainly lose security and driving at normal speeds with kayak(s) aboard will become a safety concern.

In the 1740s, Russian explorers led by Vitus Bering came in contact with the Aleutians, who had taken the basic kayak concept and developed multiple designs specifically for hunting, transportation, and environmental conditions. They soon recognized the Aleutians were very skillful at hunting sea otters by kayak. Because otters were a popular commodity in Europe and Asia, they would exploit and even kidnap Aleutians and keep them aboard their ships to work and hunt.[5]

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