One of the most important questions that you need to start with is: how many kayaks in your fleet will you need to haul at once? If it is just you and your spouse or you and a couple of comrades, then one of the roof-rack style or micro trailers is perfect. You might find that a 4-6 place kayak trailer will ensure you can transport the whole family or maybe your groups are 8, 10, or more deep!

Brake lights. Another big safety feature you’ll want to look into for your truck kayak trailer are functioning brake lights. If the car behind you on the road doesn’t know you’re braking they’re more likely to hit you. Checking your states laws on trailers and brake lights may make it more than a convenience and safety issue; you may find it’s the law in your state.


Tires. If you plan on getting a truck trailer, then of course you’ll want to have tires that are road ready. You’ll want to make sure the tread isn’t worn and there are no leaks or punctures. If you have a hand trailer, you may want to consider the type of water you’ll be putting your kayak in. If you’re planning on going to the beach, then keep in mind some tires work better in sand than others. Likewise, the lake may have a muddy entrance that you could plan ahead for with more hearty tires.
Sprint kayak is a sport held on calm water. Crews or individuals race over 200 m, 500 m, 1000 m or 5000 m with the winning boat being the first to cross the finish line. The paddler is seated, facing forward, and uses a double-bladed paddle pulling the blade through the water on alternate sides to propel the boat forward. In competition the number of paddlers within a boat is indicated by a figure besides the type of boat; K1 signifies an individual kayak race, K2 pairs, and K4 four-person crews. Kayak sprint has been in every summer olympics since it debuted at the 1936 summer olympics.[22] Racing is governed by the International Canoe Federation.
Most of the Aleut people in the Aleutian Islands eastward to Greenland Inuit relied on the kayak for hunting a variety of prey—primarily seals, though whales and caribou were important in some areas. Skin-on-frame kayaks are still being used for hunting by Inuit people in Greenland, because the smooth and flexible skin glides silently through the waves. In other parts of the world home builders are continuing the tradition of skin on frame kayaks, usually with modern skins of canvas or synthetic fabric, such as sc. ballistic nylon.

Kayaks[3] were created thousands of years ago by the Inuit, formerly known as Eskimos, of the northern Arctic regions. They used driftwood and sometimes the skeleton of whale, to construct the frame of the kayak, and animal skin, particularly seal skin was used to create the body. The main purpose for creating the kayak, which literally translates to "hunter's boat" was for hunting and fishing.[4] The kayak's stealth capabilities allowed for the hunter to sneak up behind animals on the shoreline and successfully catch their prey.
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