A: If all is correct with your kayak trailer than there is no distance limit to towing it behind your car. This depends on 2 main things. First, you must ensure that the weight of your kayak trailer remains in the safe towable limit of your cars hitch rating. Second, you will want to ensure that your kayaks are properly secured. If all of this is correct, then you will have no problems towing your kayak trailer for long distance travel.
There seem to be no anthropometry stats of kayakers, who may not be representative of the general population. In the American civilian population of the early 1960s, about 0.7% of men and 9% of women weighed under 50 kg (110 lb); 20% of men and 7% of women weighed over 190 pounds (86 kg).[10] In the same population in the late sixties, the average weight of both male and female children crossed 50 kg (110 lb) at age thirteen. In the early 2000s, it was a year or two earlier, and the mean weight of adults was over 10 kg (22 lb) heavier. Also in the early 2000s, the mean weight of men was 190 pounds (86 kg), and the mean weight of women was 163 pounds (74 kg).[11]
The design of a sea/touring kayak is perfect for gliding over open water, whether you’re out on the ocean, lake, estuary, or a river without rapids. These long boats are built to withstand wind and waves and travel long distances across the open water. However, they raise unique challenges when it comes to transportation because of their length—up to 18 feet long!
Kayaks are long—19 feet (5.8 m), short—6 feet (1.8 m), wide—42 inches (110 cm), or as narrow as the paddler's hips. They may attach one or two stabilizing hulls (outriggers), have twin hulls like catamarans, inflate or fold. They move via paddles, pedals that turn propellers or underwater flippers, under sail, or motor. They're made of wood/canvas, wood, carbon fiber, fiberglass, Kevlar, polyethylene, polyester, rubberized fabric, neoprene, nitrylon, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane, and aluminum. They may sport rudders, fins, bulkheads, seats, eyelets, foot braces and cargo hatches. They accommodate 1-3 or more paddlers/riders.

This might seem weird, but you’d be surprised how often experienced kayak anglers use their feet in some way while fishing. If your boat is narrow enough, you can actually use them as rudders to steer your drift on rivers, and they work as great anchors when fishing rip rap, laydowns, and other shallow areas – simply stick a foot out and hold on to the log until you’re done fishing the hole. Feet are also great for re-directing the boat from a stump, log, or other obstacle while your hands are busy fighting a fish.

Purchased the 4x5 Paddlesport/Utility trailer in late August after searching hi and low for a suitable transport for our kayaks. We are getting too old to lift 55Lbs + kayaks on to a car roof but want to continue using them in NH. Reviewed Malone and Loadrite and decided on the Dock Doctors after considering price, quality and functionality. Used once and loved the trailer.

Try to avoid bringing cloth clothing like t-shirts or jeans. Once it gets wet (from water or sweat) it will stay wet for a long time – not a comfortable experience in Polar weather!What will I see?You’re definitely going to see a whole lot of beauty – rugged shorelines with snow-capped mountains in the background, pristine untouched shorelines, icebergs that can turn the water beneath you a brilliant blue. The quiet nature of kayaking also makes it an excellent opportunity to encounter wildlife.


Walter Höhn (English Hoehn) had built, developed and then tested his design for a folding kayak in the white-water rivers of Switzerland from 1924 to 1927. In 1928, on emigrating to Australia, he brought 2 of them with him, lodged a patent for the design and proceeded to manufacture them. In 1942 the Australian Director of Military operations approached him to develop them for Military use. Orders were placed and eventually a total of 1024, notably the MKII & MKIII models, were produced by him and another enterprise, based on his 1942 patent (No. 117779)[23]
Fishing kayaks have been surging in popularity. These craft allow you to move stealthily across the water without the expense, upkeep, and fuel needed for a larger boat. Fishing kayaks are designed for comfort and stability and they come with convenient features for anglers, from rod holders to livewells. The challenge with fishing kayaks is that they’re often too heavy to load onto the roof of a car or SUV. It’s common for fishing kayaks to weigh over 75 pounds and some weigh over 125 pounds!
Just like boating, surfing and any other watersport, kayaking can place a kayaker’s health and safety at risk — especially if the individual fails to practice responsible safety precautions. Even though these dangers exist, you can still have a fantastic adventure in your kayak. Creating and following a safety checklist can help you have a safe and fun experience on the water.
Brake lights. Another big safety feature you’ll want to look into for your truck kayak trailer are functioning brake lights. If the car behind you on the road doesn’t know you’re braking they’re more likely to hit you. Checking your states laws on trailers and brake lights may make it more than a convenience and safety issue; you may find it’s the law in your state.
To strap your kayak properly get the straps tight and add one extra rung on the ratchet. Make sure the straps are completely straight. If they are at an angle the straps will become loose when you start driving. This will ultimately cause your kayak trailer to shift and even have your kayak fall off the trailer. You can tell it’s strapped properly when the kayak won’t move when you push on it when the straps are completely vertical.

The second tournament of the Hobie Bass Open Series took place a while a ago on Lake Shasta, California. Headwaters Adventures, as well as the US. Forest Service sponsored the event, which was a huge success by all accounts. A large number of spotted, largemouth, and smallmouth bass were caught over the course of the two-day, equal opportunity event, which operated under special use permit with the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Read More
A hand trailer is one that you will push or pull yourself. It’s intended to get your kayak into the water with ease. For example, a more popular spot to put into the river will often have substantial traffic and backing your truck into the “loading zone” will likely not be possible. (Especially if the river has a bit of a drop off, like most do). You will likely park a bit of a trek from the water and getting your kayak there will be all the easier of you have a portable conveyance that will allow you to roll the kayak to the water. A bike trailer is often one that will operate as a hand trailer, but also attach to your bike so that you can travel greater distances. If you plan on biking to your destination to start your kayaking trek, then you’ll want to look into a bike trailer that will also allow you to operate it as a hand trailer, too.
For your maximum enjoyment, we recommend that at least one person in each boat has basic paddling, river safety and steering skills. You can expect some riffles and rapids on all of our trips and rentals – rivers are not lakes and moving water requires attentive paddling. Kayak lessons and canoe lessons providing basic instruction are suggested for first timers and those looking to improve their skills. Certified guides are also available for canoe or kayak rentals for groups.
Only one hour from Washington DC on the Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia border, River & Trail offers the convenience of camping on the Potomac River, where many of our trips begin. For those people who have enjoyed the beauty and challenge of whitewater rafting, canoeing or kayaking affords a more personal experience with your boat, your companion, and the river.
Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. It is distinguished from canoeing by the sitting position of the paddler and the number of blades on the paddle. A kayak is a low-to-the-water, canoe-like boat in which the paddler sits facing forward, legs in front, using a double-bladed paddle to pull front-to-back on one side and then the other in rotation.[1] Most kayaks have closed decks, although sit-on-top and inflatable kayaks are growing in popularity as well.[2]
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