Hypothetical cross-sections of kayaks. Left to right: High primary stability but low secondary stability, lower primary stability but ~same secondary stability, lower primary but higher secondary stability, two extra chines, four extra chines. More chines (angles) give a more rounded profile, decreasing stability, tracking, and the wetted area, and increasing speed.
The more kayaks you own and the more often you use them will determine how much you would benefit from a kayak trailer. It’s true that for one (or maybe 2) you can toss it in the back (and front) of your SUV or strap it to a roof rack but even that is definitely a struggle that you won’t want to do frequently. Even if you have a smooth and uncomplicated method of transporting your kayak, that doesn’t mean you have a good method of hauling it from truck to beach or dock. A hand trailer to pull your kayak from the car to your tent and then to the water will go a long way in keeping your outing stress-free.

Make sure the paddle blades are in line with each other. If you notice that the blades are offset from each other, your paddle may be “feathered.” If this is the case, take a minute to adjust the blades back in line via a push-button or twist setting in the center of the shaft. (Feathered blades cut through wind better, but are trickier to use for first-timers.)
Tires. If you plan on getting a truck trailer, then of course you’ll want to have tires that are road ready. You’ll want to make sure the tread isn’t worn and there are no leaks or punctures. If you have a hand trailer, you may want to consider the type of water you’ll be putting your kayak in. If you’re planning on going to the beach, then keep in mind some tires work better in sand than others. Likewise, the lake may have a muddy entrance that you could plan ahead for with more hearty tires.
The size of the trailer tongue is the distance between the axle and the hitch. Why does this matter? It matters because it determines what type of trailer to get in conjunction to the size of kayak you have.  If you have a longer Sea Kayak or even a tandem you will want a longer trailer tongue length. On the contrary if you have a shorter kayak like a recreational sized yak then you can get away with a shorter tongue length.
A hand trailer is one that you will push or pull yourself. It’s intended to get your kayak into the water with ease. For example, a more popular spot to put into the river will often have substantial traffic and backing your truck into the “loading zone” will likely not be possible. (Especially if the river has a bit of a drop off, like most do). You will likely park a bit of a trek from the water and getting your kayak there will be all the easier of you have a portable conveyance that will allow you to roll the kayak to the water. A bike trailer is often one that will operate as a hand trailer, but also attach to your bike so that you can travel greater distances. If you plan on biking to your destination to start your kayaking trek, then you’ll want to look into a bike trailer that will also allow you to operate it as a hand trailer, too.
White water racers combine a fast, unstable lower hull portion with a flared upper hull portion to combine flat water racing speed with extra stability in open water: they are not fitted with rudders and have similar maneuverability to flat water racers. They usually require substantial skill to achieve stability, due to extremely narrow hulls. Whitewater racing kayaks, like all racing kayaks, are made to regulation lengths, usually of fiber reinforced resin (usually epoxy or polyester reinforced with Kevlar, glass fiber, carbon fiber, or some combination). This form of construction is stiffer and has a harder skin than non-reinforced plastic construction such as rotomolded polyethylene: stiffer means faster, and harder means fewer scratches and therefore also faster.

Wearing a fishing life jacket for your safety is a given. What else should you wear if you’re planning an all-day fishing trip? Sun protective clothing. In addition to long or short sleeve shirts, we offer hats, neck gaiters, shorts and pants that provide UPF (Ultraviolet Protection Factor) ratings of 30 to 50+. That means they absorb or block UVA and UVB radiation from the sun that not only causes skin damage and premature aging, but increases your risk of skin cancer. This is equally important on cloudy days when most of the sun’s rays still pass through the clouds. You’ll also want to apply (and re-apply as directed) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or more to any skin not covered by your clothing. A good pair of sunglasses will also protect your eyes from damaging UV radiation and improve visibility and comfort by filtering out glare.


Regardless of which body of water you choose to kayak in, it’s a good idea to plan out a route ahead of time. If you’re kayaking in a lake or pond, be aware of shoreline areas which you won’t be able to easily access in the event of an emergency. If you’re kayaking down a river or stream, make sure you choose a route with typically calm waters. It’s best to stay away from areas which could become more challenging if you accidentally paddle too far, especially if you’re new to kayaking.
The Vibe Tribe is full of kayakers and kayak anglers, but more than that, we share a love of doing anything outdoors, from just hanging to every outdoor sport imaginable. On the water or on land, we believe that being in nature makes you a better person. Grab one of our kayaks or SUPs, grab your wakeboard, mountain bike or hiking boots and come out to play. Fill one of our coolers with refreshments, put on some of our gear and get outside. It’s a big world and there’s room for everyone in nature. Good people, good vibes. That’s our Vibe Tribe.
Walter Höhn (English Hoehn) had built, developed and then tested his design for a folding kayak in the white-water rivers of Switzerland from 1924 to 1927. In 1928, on emigrating to Australia, he brought 2 of them with him, lodged a patent for the design and proceeded to manufacture them. In 1942 the Australian Director of Military operations approached him to develop them for Military use. Orders were placed and eventually a total of 1024, notably the MKII & MKIII models, were produced by him and another enterprise, based on his 1942 patent (No. 117779)[23]
The most popular kayaks for fishing are rotationally molded from polyethylene due to their durability and lower cost. Hard shell kayaks are preferred over inflatable kayaks, since they are not susceptible to lure punctures.[5] Generally, kayak fishermen look for stable, durable and comfortable designs. The new generation of twinhull (catamaran) kayaks that was recently introduced into the market is stable enough to enable both paddling and fishing in the standing position. This technological development also solves some ergonomic problems that are associated with sitting for long hours without being able to change positions, and frees kayakers from the need to sacrifice speed to stability, which is another problem that characterizes monohull kayaks.
If the displacement of a kayak is not enough to support the passenger(s) and gear, it will sink. If the displacement is excessive, the kayak will float too high, catch the wind and waves uncomfortably, and handle poorly;[6] it will probably also be bigger and heavier and than it needs to be. Being excessively big will create more drag, and the kayak will move more slowly and take more effort.[7] Rolling is easier in lower-displacement kayaks. On the other hand, a higher deck will keep the paddler(s) dryer and make self-rescue and coming through surf easier.[6] Many paddlers who use a sit-in kayak feel more secure in a kayak with a weight capacity substantially more than their own weight. Maximum volume in a sit-in kayak is helped by a wide hull with high sides. But paddling ease is helped by lower sides where the paddler sits and a narrower width.
Entry level kayak anglers will find quality information, regional blogs with kayak fishing info and tutorials, direction to all the fisheries and a lot more in the weeks and months ahead.  After more than 20 years reaching anglers making their first searches, we’re adding resources for veteran kayak anglers too.  Pour through the site menu and feel free to contact us for info or send a fishy picture anytime along the way.
Whitewater kayaking or canoeing is a great way to enjoy the outdoors while choosing your level of adventure. Zoar Outdoor offers full-day white water kayaking and canoeing lessons on the Deerfield River to suit every level of paddler. Whether you are interested in an introduction to the sport of kayaking or canoeing or taking your kayaking skills to the next level with a playboating, river rescue or other clinics, our kayak school has a course for you.
If you’re not sure if you’re quite ready for kayaking then please don’t hesitate to get in contact with us, we’d be more than happy to help you with any questions you might have.Getting ready for kayaking © Elke Lindner-Oceanwide ExpeditionsHow many times will I get to go kayaking?Kayaking is of course subject to weather and water conditions – your safety is our primary concern. That being said, any cruise with kayaking as an option tries to schedule up to four excursions.Is kayaking safe?One must take some caution when kayaking. First, you are exposed to Polar weather and sea conditions, and if you don’t dress warmly enough you might be some time before getting back to the main ship. Because you are on Polar waters there is a chance of exposure to hypothermia. For these reasons kayak excursions are limited to 14 passengers total – this number lets our accompanying guides keep track of everyone and make sure that everyone is having a good time.
Kayaks can also be classified by their design and the materials from which they are made. Each design has its specific advantage, including performance, manoeuvrability, stability and paddling style. Kayaks can be made of metal, fibreglass, wood, plastic, fabrics, and inflatable fabrics such as PVC or rubber, and more recently expensive but feather light carbon fiber. Each material also has its specific advantage, including strength, durability, portability, flexibility, resistance to ultraviolet and storage requirements. For example, wooden kayaks can be created from kits or built by hand. Stitch and glue, plywood kayaks can be lighter than any other material except skin-on frame. Inflatable kayaks, made from lightweight fabric, can be deflated and easily transported and stored, and are considered to be remarkably tough and durable compared to some hard-sided boats.[9][10]
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