The Australian Military MKII and MKIII folding kayaks were extensively used during the 1941-1945 Pacific War for some 33 raids and missions on and around the South-East Asian islands. Documentation for this will be found in the National Archives of Australia official records, reference No. NAA K1214-123/1/06. They were deployed from disguised watercraft, submarines, Catalina aircraft, P.T. boats, motor launches and by parachute.[29]
A: While many people mistakenly think that only big trucks and SUVs can tow a loaded kayak trailer, this isn’t the truth. Any vehicle that is equipped with a tow package can pull a trailer. It is important to look into the weight rating that your vehicle can tow as well as the hitch rating. Be sure to not only take into account how heavy the trailer is but also the weight of the trailer fully loaded with kayaks.
There are many types of kayaks used in flat water and whitewater kayaking. The sizes and shapes vary drastically depending on what type of water to be paddled on and also what the paddler would like to do. The second set of essentials for kayaking is an off-set paddle where the paddle blades are tilted to help reduce wind resistance while the other blade is being used in the water. These vary in length and also shape depending on the intended use, height of the paddler, and the paddler's preference. Kayaks should be equipped with one or more buoyancy aid (also called flotation) which creates air space that helps prevent a kayak from sinking when filled with water. A life jacket should be worn at all times (also called a personal flotation device or PFD), and a helmet is also often required for most kayaking and is mandatory for white water kayaking.[11][12] Various other pieces of safety gear include a whistle for signaling for help; throwing ropes to help rescue other kayakers; and, a diving knife and appropriate water shoes should used depending upon the risks the water and terrain pose. Proper clothing such as a dry suit, wetsuit or spray top also help protect kayakers from cold water or air temperatures.[13]
Traditional kayaks encompass three types: Baidarkas, from the Bering sea & Aleutian islands, the oldest design, whose rounded shape and numerous chines give them an almost Blimp-like appearance; West Greenland kayaks, with fewer chines and a more angular shape, with gunwales rising to a point at the bow and stern; and East Greenland kayaks that appear similar to the West Greenland style, but often fit more snugly to the paddler and possess a steeper angle between gunwale and stem, which lends maneuverability.
This might seem weird, but you’d be surprised how often experienced kayak anglers use their feet in some way while fishing. If your boat is narrow enough, you can actually use them as rudders to steer your drift on rivers, and they work as great anchors when fishing rip rap, laydowns, and other shallow areas – simply stick a foot out and hold on to the log until you’re done fishing the hole. Feet are also great for re-directing the boat from a stump, log, or other obstacle while your hands are busy fighting a fish.

Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. It is distinguished from canoeing by the sitting position of the paddler and the number of blades on the paddle. A kayak is a low-to-the-water, canoe-like boat in which the paddler sits facing forward, legs in front, using a double-bladed paddle to pull front-to-back on one side and then the other in rotation.[1] Most kayaks have closed decks, although sit-on-top and inflatable kayaks are growing in popularity as well.[2]
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