Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq (ᖃᔭᖅ Inuktitut pronunciation: [qɑˈjɑq]), Yup'ik: qayaq (from qai- "surface; top"),[2] Aleut: Iqyax) were originally developed by the Inuit, Yup'ik, and Aleut. They used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched seal or other animal skins stretched over a wood or whalebone-skeleton frame. (Western Alaskan Natives used wood whereas the eastern Inuit used whalebone due to the treeless landscape). Kayaks are believed to be at least 4,000 years old. The oldest existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich, with the oldest dating from 1577.[3]
The TMS CART-CANOE Deluxe Kayak Carrier is made with aluminum pipes, and reinforced with anodized stainless steel so your trailer is a lightweight one with added durability. The tires are a durable solid 9.5″ in diameter and handle grass, gravel, and sand well, so taking this to the beach is a breeze. And the no-air feature means you won’t need to refill tires in between uses.
For your maximum enjoyment, we recommend that at least one person in each boat has basic paddling, river safety and steering skills. You can expect some riffles and rapids on all of our trips and rentals – rivers are not lakes and moving water requires attentive paddling. Kayak lessons and canoe lessons providing basic instruction are suggested for first timers and those looking to improve their skills. Certified guides are also available for canoe or kayak rentals for groups.

Kayaks come in very different shapes and sizes, what you need in a kayak trailer depends on whether you’re hauling whitewater, sea, touring or fishing kayaks. GO and GO Easy Adventure Trailers were designed to accommodate all types of boats. In our photo gallery, you can see examples of different types of kayaks and how they fit—although the possibilities certainly don’t stop there!


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Modern kayaks have evolved into specialized types that may be broadly categorized according to their application as sea or touring kayaks, whitewater (or river) kayaks, surf kayaks, racing kayaks, fishing kayaks, and recreational kayaks. The broader kayak categories today are 'Sit-In', which is inspired mainly by traditional kayak forms, 'Sit-On-Top' (SOT), which evolved from paddle boards that were outfitted with footrests and a backrest, 'Hybrid', which are essentially canoes featuring a narrower beam and a reduced free board enabling the paddler to propel them from the middle of the boat, using a double blade paddle (i.e. 'kayak paddle'), and twin hull kayaks offering each of the paddler's legs a narrow hull of its own. In recent decades, kayaks design have proliferated to a point where the only broadly accepted denominator for them is their being designed mainly for paddling using a kayak paddle featuring two blades i.e. 'kayak paddle'. However, even this inclusive definition is being challenged by other means of human powered propulsion, such as foot activated pedal drives combined with rotating or sideways moving propellers, electric motors, and even outboard motors.
Inflatables, also known as the duckies or IKs, can usually be transported by hand using a carry bag. They are generally made of hypalon (a kind of neoprene), Nytrylon (a rubberized fabric), PVC, or polyurethane coated cloth. They can be inflated with foot, hand or electric pumps. Multiple compartments in all but the least expensive increase safety. They generally use low pressure air, almost always below 3 psi.
While native people of the Arctic regions did not rely on kayaks for fishing, in recent years sport fishing from kayaks has become popular in both fresh and salt water, especially in warmer regions due to the ease of entry. Kayaks can be purchased inexpensively and have little maintenance cost. Kayaks can be stored in small spaces and launched quickly. Kayak wheels and trailers can be purchased to assist in the transportation of kayaks. Many kayak anglers have started customizing their kayaks for fishing.[2]
Kayaking has always been a great way to relax and enjoy the water, but now more and more people are discovering that it’s also a great way to fish. Kayaks are quiet and can get into places where the fish are hiding—some places so narrow or shallow that motor boats can’t get into. There are lots of options, from sit-on-top and sit-inside to pedal-powered and motorized to hybrid, so explore and then choose the right one for you and the fishing you do.
Spending a tranquil afternoon out on the water can be a great way to unwind and enjoy the great outdoors. Kayaks offer an affordable and exciting way to get out on the water and have some adventures. Purchasing kayaks for your family doesn’t have to be a daunting experience. There are actually plenty of options available for people of all skill levels, and it’s a great way to break into watersports without emptying your bank account.
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq, Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᔭᖅ) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood, as many of the areas of their construction were treeless. Archaeologists have found evidence indicating that kayaks are at least 4000 years old.[1] The oldest still existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich.[citation needed]

Kayaks can also be classified by their design and the materials from which they are made. Each design has its specific advantage, including performance, manoeuvrability, stability and paddling style. Kayaks can be made of metal, fibreglass, wood, plastic, fabrics, and inflatable fabrics such as PVC or rubber, and more recently expensive but feather light carbon fiber. Each material also has its specific advantage, including strength, durability, portability, flexibility, resistance to ultraviolet and storage requirements. For example, wooden kayaks can be created from kits or built by hand. Stitch and glue, plywood kayaks can be lighter than any other material except skin-on frame. Inflatable kayaks, made from lightweight fabric, can be deflated and easily transported and stored, and are considered to be remarkably tough and durable compared to some hard-sided boats.[9][10]
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