Fishing kayaks have been surging in popularity. These craft allow you to move stealthily across the water without the expense, upkeep, and fuel needed for a larger boat. Fishing kayaks are designed for comfort and stability and they come with convenient features for anglers, from rod holders to livewells. The challenge with fishing kayaks is that they’re often too heavy to load onto the roof of a car or SUV. It’s common for fishing kayaks to weigh over 75 pounds and some weigh over 125 pounds!
For your maximum enjoyment, we recommend that at least one person in each boat has basic paddling, river safety and steering skills. You can expect some riffles and rapids on all of our trips and rentals – rivers are not lakes and moving water requires attentive paddling. Kayak lessons and canoe lessons providing basic instruction are suggested for first timers and those looking to improve their skills. Certified guides are also available for canoe or kayak rentals for groups.
Kickstand. If you’re shopping for a hand trailer that you’ll be operating by (obviously) hand, you will want to look into the ease of use and one of the biggest operating conveniences is a kickstand. By utilizing a kickstand (like with your bike) you’ll be able to take your hands off your kayak without it falling to the ground. That means you can run to the bathroom, get your life vest on, or just high-five your bro without damaging your kayak.
It does this by its marine grade pre-galvanized frame which is also rust resistant. This is ideal for those who venture into the ocean as you will not have to worry about corrosion. Even their wheels are galvanized so you can drive the trailer right into to the water. This means that you will no longer have to haul your kayak in and out of the water. Malone even includes a spare tire for you which will help keep you safe. You will find that this package even includes J-style kayak saddles to make attaching your kayaks even easier. This user friendly package comes with clear instructions to make building this trailer easier.
Tyler is a Wisconsin native currently residing in beautiful Western Wisconsin with his wife and children. Tyler is an avid kayak angler, participating in online Kayak Bass Fishing/TourneyX tournaments. He also shares his experiences through his blog, Small Craft Fisherman. He loves to share his passion of kayak fishing with others, teach others, and watch them succeed. Thus, he and his wife decided to start a new kayak fishing guide and sales business in Western Wisconsin called Small Craft Outfitters. Feel free to reach out to him via his guide page, blog, or associated social media accounts.
The instructions for how you get out of a kayak are easy to remember — just complete the steps in reverse. When exiting on the shore, paddle your kayak into shallow water or as close to the land as possible. Swing your legs out of the kayak, gain your footing and stand up. When exiting the kayak on a dock, turn your body to face the dock and pull yourself out of the kayak.
If you lose control of your kayak, don’t fight it. Imagine driving down a road and losing control of your car due to ice, dirt or other slick conditions. Trying to regain control of the vehicle abruptly could cause you to overcorrect and make the situation worse. Instead, it’s best to maintain as much control of the car as possible and move in the direction of the vehicle. The same applies to kayaking. If you suddenly start to spin, move with the kayak and adjust accordingly.
Comfort is key during long hours on the water. Sit-on-top kayaks are ideal for beginners or novice anglers. And this brand of kayak is easier to get in and out of from the dock or the shore. Sit-in seats are typically above water-level, so these boats are wider than traditional kayaks. For added comfort, choose a fishing kayak with a padded and adjustable seat and adjustable foot pegs.
Martin Dies, Jr. State Park Paddling Trails: Includes information about the Neches Paddling Trail, Walnut Slough Paddling Trail and Sandy Creek Paddling Trail, three trails running through and around Martin Dies, Jr. State Park that offer 3 to 16 miles of trails for a variety of experiences – from the park’s backwater sloughs and a wide open lake to a fast-moving river.
Flight San Francisco - Los Angeles (SFO - LAX) $38+ Flight Oakland - Los Angeles (OAK - LAX) $42+ Flight Austin - Los Angeles (AUS - LAX) $97+ Flight Denver - Los Angeles (DEN - LAX) $110+ Flight Houston - Los Angeles (HOU - LAX) $111+ Flight Houston - Los Angeles (IAH - LAX) $111+ Flight Minneapolis - Los Angeles (MSP - LAX) $118+ Flight Dallas - Los Angeles (DFW - LAX) $119+ Flight Seattle - Los Angeles (SEA - LAX) $127+ Flight Chicago - Los Angeles (ORD - LAX) $135+ Flight New York - Los Angeles (LGA - LAX) $135+ Flight Newark - Los Angeles (EWR - LAX) $149+
Skin on frame boats are more traditional in design, materials, and construction. They were traditionally made of driftwood, pegged or lashed together, and stretched seal skin, as those were the most readily available materials in the Arctic regions. Today, seal skin is usually replaced with canvas or nylon cloth covered with paint, polyurethane, or a hypalon rubber coating and a wooden or aluminum frame. Modern skin-on-frame kayaks often possess greater impact resistance than their fiberglass counterparts, but are less durable against abrasion or sharp objects. They are often the lightest kayaks.
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq (ᖃᔭᖅ Inuktitut pronunciation: [qɑˈjɑq]), Yup'ik: qayaq (from qai- "surface; top"),[2] Aleut: Iqyax) were originally developed by the Inuit, Yup'ik, and Aleut. They used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched seal or other animal skins stretched over a wood or whalebone-skeleton frame. (Western Alaskan Natives used wood whereas the eastern Inuit used whalebone due to the treeless landscape). Kayaks are believed to be at least 4,000 years old. The oldest existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich, with the oldest dating from 1577.[3]
Traditional kayaks encompass three types: Baidarkas, from the Bering sea & Aleutian islands, the oldest design, whose rounded shape and numerous chines give them an almost Blimp-like appearance; West Greenland kayaks, with fewer chines and a more angular shape, with gunwales rising to a point at the bow and stern; and East Greenland kayaks that appear similar to the West Greenland style, but often fit more snugly to the paddler and possess a steeper angle between gunwale and stem, which lends maneuverability.
FOR THE PERSON THAT HAS MORE THAN 1 CANOE, KAYAK OR SMALL BOAT. THIS UNIT HAS 250 POUND CAPACITY AND WILL HOLD 2 CANOES OR UP TO 4 KAYAKS. IT HAS ADJUSTABLE 72" WIDE CROSSBARS (FRONT TO REAR) AND A FULLY ADJUSTABLE AXLE, FOR TONGUE WEIGHT. ADJUSTABLE TIE DOWN LOOPS (6) ARE ALSO STANDARD. THE PERFECT "FAMILY TRAILER". IT IS 14' 11" LONG AND 72" WIDE (AT THE CROSSBARS). 1 7/8" BALL COUPLER
This may be the most difficult adjustment for anglers used to fishing from the bank, or the stable front deck of a boat. Even the most stable kayaks don’t have much room between the sitting surface and the water – making the standard two-handed windup cast a dicey proposition. Experienced kayak anglers cast one handed the majority of the time, with either baitcasting or spinning tackle, so it’s important to gear up accordingly. Instead of the super heavy flipping stick and 1 ounce jig, maybe opt to fish with lighter combos and more finesse tactics.

Getting into your kayak from a dock involves a little more skill. Lower your kayak from the dock onto the surface of the water, making sure to keep the kayak parallel to the dock. You can keep your kayak from shifting positions by placing either end of the paddle on the kayak and the dock. As you’re sitting on the edge of the dock, lower your feet into the kayak first. Then, quickly position your body towards the front of the kayak and lower yourself into the seat.
Disclosure: The Adventure Junkies is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission at no extra cost for you. We also use other affiliate programs like REI, LeisurePro, Diviac and Liveaboard.com.
A specialized variant of racing craft called a surf ski has an open cockpit and can be up to 21 feet (6.4 m) long but only 18 inches (46 cm) wide, requiring expert balance and paddling skill. Surf skis were originally created for surf and are still used in races in New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa. They have become popular in the United States for ocean races, lake races and even downriver races.

We purchased a Paddlesport Trailer from the Dock Doctors, and we're very happy. Not only is the trailer light, maneuverable, and versatile, the Dock Doctors' customer service is great! We had some trouble getting the trailer lights to work with our vehicle. We returned to the shop, and one of their staff stayed with us--after hours--until he resolved the problem. They are friendly, helpful and dedicated!


This is the best 4 kayak trailer that can hold up to 4 kayaks. Like most trailers on our list this one is made from marine grade galvanized steel. The frame is a T-Box design that uses a leaf spring suspension system. You won’t have to worry about the axle as it’s also galvanized and heavy duty. The wheels are on the smaller size at 8 inches but can still carry up to 4 full sized kayaks, stand up paddle boards or even canoes weighing up to 275 lbs. Your gear will rest on foam blocks included with this trailer.
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq, Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᔭᖅ) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood, as many of the areas of their construction were treeless. Archaeologists have found evidence indicating that kayaks are at least 4000 years old.[1] The oldest still existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich.[citation needed]
Some modern boats vary considerably from a traditional design but still claim the title "kayak", for instance in eliminating the cockpit by seating the paddler on top of the boat ("sit-on-top" kayaks); having inflated air chambers surrounding the boat; replacing the single hull by twin hulls, and replacing paddles with other human-powered propulsion methods, such as foot-powered rotational propellers and "flippers". Kayaks are also being sailed, as well as propelled by means of small electric motors, and even by outboard gas engines.
×