Flight Denver - Chicago (DEN - ORD) $63+ Flight Dallas - Chicago (DFW - ORD) $97+ Flight Minneapolis - Chicago (MSP - ORD) $97+ Flight Washington - Chicago (BWI - ORD) $106+ Flight Atlanta - Chicago (ATL - ORD) $109+ Flight New York - Chicago (LGA - ORD) $116+ Flight Miami - Chicago (MIA - ORD) $118+ Flight Orlando - Chicago (MCO - ORD) $122+ Flight Los Angeles - Chicago (LAX - ORD) $123+

Be visible—Kayaks come in various colors, including many highly visible ones. (The color does’t change your fishing productivity. Kayaks are stealthy and often will bump into fish before they notice it.) Paddles also come in various high-vis colors. Reflective tape can be used to increase visibility. Other visibility options: colorful or reflective PFD and clothing, bright flags and lights, and a safety whistle or air horn.

Malone made this heavy duty Xtralight trailer that has a military grade galvanized steel frame you can trust. With leaf spring suspension you can be assured that your kayaks will be protected even on bumpy roads. The heavy duty axle features 2 sets of padded V racks which allow you to transport your kayaks without a scratch. With a 2 kayak capacity, it is clear to see why this is the best multiple kayak trailer. Malone includes everything you need to pull your 2 kayak trailer including 12 foot load straps and mounting hardware.


Only one hour from Washington DC on the Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia border, River & Trail offers the convenience of camping on the Potomac River, where many of our trips begin. For those people who have enjoyed the beauty and challenge of whitewater rafting, canoeing or kayaking affords a more personal experience with your boat, your companion, and the river.
Unique to all the sites that followed, anglers can still reach a guide (or pro-staffer) directly through Kayakfishing.com.  By phone, email or text.   A handful of kayak fishing experts, including writers, guides and exceptionally talented kayak anglers in all the fisheries, have been fielding inquiries from anglers for 20 years.  Ranging from “Which kayak should I buy” to “Which knot should I tie…..and a lot of “How do I catch ________”, it’s a great way to meet kayak anglers and we look forward to hooking up with you anytime.
Many a conversation have taken place as to whether you should build your own DIY kayak trailer or buy a manufactured one. If you are mechanically-inclined enough to rig or weld your Harbor Freight trailer into a taller, leveled, multi-kayak device, go for it! But for many of us who prefer to spend our time on the water and in our kayaks, having a high-quality trailer that we can back up to, hook up, and go is all the work we need. The expert brands that make trailers these days have been through enough iterations to have a perfect product for all levels of paddlers.

Thanks to Wali for his excerpt from the Idiot’s Guide. How? Poke large hole(s) in your perfectly good Kayak and set it in place with some stick-um and screws. Seriously though, it really is about that simple. A 2 1/4″ hole saw works real well to poke the hole and I like 3m 4200 as a sealant. Don’t drill the screw holes until you put the holder in place and rotate it to the position you want your rod to point in and it fits inside your hull (I shortened mine some). Be careful and don’t over tighten the screws […]


Plan your first few trips to be short and safe. Choose a bright and sunny day that doesn’t have a forecast of rain or high winds to keep your environmental challenges as predictable as possible. Also, know your limits and underestimate the amount of time you can safely kayak before you get fatigued. Like other workouts, you don’t want to overdo your first kayaking trips and make it difficult to paddle back to shore. Limit your first trip to an hour and then extend as you feel comfortable.

Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq (ᖃᔭᖅ Inuktitut pronunciation: [qɑˈjɑq]), Yup'ik: qayaq (from qai- "surface; top"),[2] Aleut: Iqyax) were originally developed by the Inuit, Yup'ik, and Aleut. They used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched seal or other animal skins stretched over a wood or whalebone-skeleton frame. (Western Alaskan Natives used wood whereas the eastern Inuit used whalebone due to the treeless landscape). Kayaks are believed to be at least 4,000 years old. The oldest existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich, with the oldest dating from 1577.[3]
Editorially, we strive to promote anglers and kayak fishing over advertising, new products and sponsorships.  The site is not dependent on advertisers and we recommend all the proven gear as we know it to best serve each angler in their fishery.  The few names branded here represent proven products and services for kayak fishing, that we’ve sought out, and we are proud t0 lend our endorsement to.
Modern kayaks have evolved into specialized types that may be broadly categorized according to their application as sea or touring kayaks, whitewater (or river) kayaks, surf kayaks, racing kayaks, fishing kayaks, and recreational kayaks. The broader kayak categories today are 'Sit-In', which is inspired mainly by traditional kayak forms, 'Sit-On-Top' (SOT), which evolved from paddle boards that were outfitted with footrests and a backrest, 'Hybrid', which are essentially canoes featuring a narrower beam and a reduced free board enabling the paddler to propel them from the middle of the boat, using a double blade paddle (i.e. 'kayak paddle'), and twin hull kayaks offering each of the paddler's legs a narrow hull of its own. In recent decades, kayaks design have proliferated to a point where the only broadly accepted denominator for them is their being designed mainly for paddling using a kayak paddle featuring two blades i.e. 'kayak paddle'. However, even this inclusive definition is being challenged by other means of human powered propulsion, such as foot activated pedal drives combined with rotating or sideways moving propellers, electric motors, and even outboard motors.
While native people of the Arctic regions did not rely on kayaks for fishing, in recent years sport fishing from kayaks has become popular in both fresh and salt water, especially in warmer regions due to the ease of entry. Kayaks can be purchased inexpensively and have little maintenance cost. Kayaks can be stored in small spaces and launched quickly. Kayak wheels and trailers can be purchased to assist in the transportation of kayaks. Many kayak anglers have started customizing their kayaks for fishing.[2]
In the 1740s, Russian explorers led by Vitus Bering came in contact with the Aleutians, who had taken the basic kayak concept and developed multiple designs specifically for hunting, transportation, and environmental conditions. They soon recognized the Aleutians were very skillful at hunting sea otters by kayak. Because otters were a popular commodity in Europe and Asia, they would exploit and even kidnap Aleutians and keep them aboard their ships to work and hunt.[5]
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