"An excellent kayak that is a pleasure to fish from . I can pedal in 12-13 inches of water and not worry about the prop . Cruising at 3.5 mph is very easy for a couple of hours , but trying to go fast is a waste of time . The hull will push water instead of slicing through it . The ride is very dry and the seat is about 5.5" above the floor so even in rough water..."

You may also want to pick up a kayak trailer if you’re thinking long-term. If you have a lifestyle that lends to adventure, then its reasonable to assume you’ll make friends or build a family that will join you kayaking. It’s not a bad idea to pick a trailer up before you build that family because you’ll probably better be able to afford it. And, to put it a way that will appeal to your self-interest: if you’re the person that has the kayak trailer, you’re pretty much guaranteed invites for excursions.

There are many types of kayaks used in flat water and whitewater kayaking. The sizes and shapes vary drastically depending on what type of water to be paddled on and also what the paddler would like to do. The second set of essentials for kayaking is an off-set paddle where the paddle blades are tilted to help reduce wind resistance while the other blade is being used in the water. These vary in length and also shape depending on the intended use, height of the paddler, and the paddler's preference. Kayaks should be equipped with one or more buoyancy aid (also called flotation) which creates air space that helps prevent a kayak from sinking when filled with water. A life jacket should be worn at all times (also called a personal flotation device or PFD), and a helmet is also often required for most kayaking and is mandatory for white water kayaking.[11][12] Various other pieces of safety gear include a whistle for signaling for help; throwing ropes to help rescue other kayakers; and, a diving knife and appropriate water shoes should used depending upon the risks the water and terrain pose. Proper clothing such as a dry suit, wetsuit or spray top also help protect kayakers from cold water or air temperatures.[13]


Just like the one handed cast, efficient kayak angling requires skill in handling a paddle with one hand. Paddling a kayak is simple with two hands, as the rhythm comes easily to even the least experienced of anglers. But what do you do when you’re fighting a fish with one hand, and you’ve got to steer your boat back upstream to get on the other side of a laydown or avoid an overhanging branch? Practice locking the shaft of your paddle along a forearm, which anchors it along your arm, and allows you to use it more like a canoe paddle.

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Kickstand. If you’re shopping for a hand trailer that you’ll be operating by (obviously) hand, you will want to look into the ease of use and one of the biggest operating conveniences is a kickstand. By utilizing a kickstand (like with your bike) you’ll be able to take your hands off your kayak without it falling to the ground. That means you can run to the bathroom, get your life vest on, or just high-five your bro without damaging your kayak.
Kayaks[3] were created thousands of years ago by the Inuit, formerly known as Eskimos, of the northern Arctic regions. They used driftwood and sometimes the skeleton of whale, to construct the frame of the kayak, and animal skin, particularly seal skin was used to create the body. The main purpose for creating the kayak, which literally translates to "hunter's boat" was for hunting and fishing.[4] The kayak's stealth capabilities allowed for the hunter to sneak up behind animals on the shoreline and successfully catch their prey.
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