"An excellent kayak that is a pleasure to fish from . I can pedal in 12-13 inches of water and not worry about the prop . Cruising at 3.5 mph is very easy for a couple of hours , but trying to go fast is a waste of time . The hull will push water instead of slicing through it . The ride is very dry and the seat is about 5.5" above the floor so even in rough water..."


1) You do not need to buy a top of the line kayak, but you do need to talk to some experienced people about the best kind of kayak for the water you plan to be fishing, combined with your height/weight and paddling ability. I see articles stating that you can start with a $200 kayak. That’s true, for some folks. But I’ve fielded a lot of phone calls from people who bought big box store kayaks that can’t carry their weight. It helps to talk to people who know kayaks, before you buy.
Kayaking has always been a great way to relax and enjoy the water, but now more and more people are discovering that it’s also a great way to fish. Kayaks are quiet and can get into places where the fish are hiding—some places so narrow or shallow that motor boats can’t get into. There are lots of options, from sit-on-top and sit-inside to pedal-powered and motorized to hybrid, so explore and then choose the right one for you and the fishing you do.

Kayaks can also be classified by their design and the materials from which they are made. Each design has its specific advantage, including performance, manoeuvrability, stability and paddling style. Kayaks can be made of metal, fibreglass, wood, plastic, fabrics, and inflatable fabrics such as PVC or rubber, and more recently expensive but feather light carbon fiber. Each material also has its specific advantage, including strength, durability, portability, flexibility, resistance to ultraviolet and storage requirements. For example, wooden kayaks can be created from kits or built by hand. Stitch and glue, plywood kayaks can be lighter than any other material except skin-on frame. Inflatable kayaks, made from lightweight fabric, can be deflated and easily transported and stored, and are considered to be remarkably tough and durable compared to some hard-sided boats.[9][10]
The most popular kayaks for fishing are rotationally molded from polyethylene due to their durability and lower cost. Hard shell kayaks are preferred over inflatable kayaks, since they are not susceptible to lure punctures.[5] Generally, kayak fishermen look for stable, durable and comfortable designs. The new generation of twinhull (catamaran) kayaks that was recently introduced into the market is stable enough to enable both paddling and fishing in the standing position. This technological development also solves some ergonomic problems that are associated with sitting for long hours without being able to change positions, and frees kayakers from the need to sacrifice speed to stability, which is another problem that characterizes monohull kayaks.

Kayaks can also be classified by their design and the materials from which they are made. Each design has its specific advantage, including performance, manoeuvrability, stability and paddling style. Kayaks can be made of metal, fibreglass, wood, plastic, fabrics, and inflatable fabrics such as PVC or rubber, and more recently expensive but feather light carbon fiber. Each material also has its specific advantage, including strength, durability, portability, flexibility, resistance to ultraviolet and storage requirements. For example, wooden kayaks can be created from kits or built by hand. Stitch and glue, plywood kayaks can be lighter than any other material except skin-on frame. Inflatable kayaks, made from lightweight fabric, can be deflated and easily transported and stored, and are considered to be remarkably tough and durable compared to some hard-sided boats.[9][10]
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