Although I wanted the basic trailer when I first contacted the company, I’m now glad I upgraded to one of the utility bed models. Rather than stuffing my small SUV with pedal drives, gear crates, seats, paddles and fishing tackle, I now bungee stuff beneath my kayaks. It speeds up loading, and I can rinse the salt off my kayaks and fishing gear simultaneously. Transporting salty accessories on the trailer also protects the interior of my SUV from corrosion. After hosing everything off, I just back the loaded trailer into the garage, keeping my kayaks and gear secure overnight, ready for the morning fishing trip. The bed design prevents pooling water, so gear dries quickly and very little water drips on my garage floor. [ read the entire review here 10/6/17 ]
If you’re not sure if you’re quite ready for kayaking then please don’t hesitate to get in contact with us, we’d be more than happy to help you with any questions you might have.Getting ready for kayaking © Elke Lindner-Oceanwide ExpeditionsHow many times will I get to go kayaking?Kayaking is of course subject to weather and water conditions – your safety is our primary concern. That being said, any cruise with kayaking as an option tries to schedule up to four excursions.Is kayaking safe?One must take some caution when kayaking. First, you are exposed to Polar weather and sea conditions, and if you don’t dress warmly enough you might be some time before getting back to the main ship. Because you are on Polar waters there is a chance of exposure to hypothermia. For these reasons kayak excursions are limited to 14 passengers total – this number lets our accompanying guides keep track of everyone and make sure that everyone is having a good time.

Before you learn how to ride in a kayak, you first need to learn how to get in and out of a kayak. Getting in and out of a kayak can be tricky, but we’re confident that after a little practice, you’ll catch on quickly. Put simply, there are two different ways which you will likely enter a kayak — getting into a kayak on land or in shallow depths of water, or getting into one that’s already in deeper water. Both options have their advantages and challenges.
You might think current is a nightmare to fish in a kayak, but that’s actually far from the truth – provided you know how to use it to your advantage. Most kayaks are short and light enough to actually sit entirely in an eddy, preventing the boat from moving downstream, and giving you plenty of time to thoroughly fish the corresponding current seam. To maximize this, go past the spot you want to fish, then tuck into the eddy behind it, and fish until your heart’s content – without even having to paddle.
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Recreational kayaks are designed for the casual paddler interested in fishing, photography, or a peaceful paddle on a lake, flatwater stream or protected salt water away from strong ocean waves. These boats presently make up the largest segment of kayak sales. Compared to other kayaks, recreational kayaks have a larger cockpit for easier entry and exit and a wider beam (27–36 inches (69–91 cm)) for more stability. They are generally less than 12 feet (3.7 m) in length and have limited cargo capacity. Less expensive materials like polyethylene and fewer options keep these boats relatively inexpensive. Most canoe/kayak clubs offer introductory instruction in recreational boats. They do not perform as well in the sea. The recreational kayak is usually a type of touring kayak.
The Yakima Rack and Roll Trailer has a shock absorbing system that’s the same style as a full sized motorcycle, making the ride smoother for your kayaks and them less likely to be damaged by any of the bumps or knocks that come with any road trip. Because the cross bars are compatible with any Yakima product (and others, if the reviews are to be believed; though they don’t advertise that), you can use this for more than your kayaks, too. You can even secure a cargo carrier next to your kayak, or a bike or two! (Just be careful on the weight.)

Jenny is a frequent contributing author for Adventure Digest. She’s originally from Central Ohio but has lived all over the world with her family, including Texas, Florida and Germany, among other places. She’s grown her family along the way and currently calls Eastern PA home with her husband, dogs, and children. Jenny is a camping enthusiast and has been writing about outdoor adventures since 2015.
Native builders designed and built their boats based on their own experience and that of the generations before them, passed on through oral tradition. The word "kayak" means "man's boat" or "hunter's boat", and native kayaks were a personal craft, each built by the man who used it—with assistance from his wife, who sewed the skins—[dubious – discuss]and closely fitting his size for maximum maneuverability. The paddler wore a tuilik, a garment that was stretched over the rim of the kayak coaming, and sealed with drawstrings at the coaming, wrists, and hood edges. This enabled the "eskimo roll" and rescue to become the preferred methods of recovery after capsizing, especially as few Inuit could swim; their waters are too cold for a swimmer to survive for long.[4]
While native people of the Arctic regions did not rely on kayaks for fishing, in recent years sport fishing from kayaks has become popular in both fresh and salt water, especially in warmer regions due to the ease of entry. Kayaks can be purchased inexpensively and have little maintenance cost. Kayaks can be stored in small spaces and launched quickly. Kayak wheels and trailers can be purchased to assist in the transportation of kayaks. Many kayak anglers have started customizing their kayaks for fishing.[2]
Be sure to always check the length restrictions that your trailer will have. You do not want to be driving down the road with a ton of overhang from your kayak. Typically speaking the length of your trailer tongue will determine the length of a kayak trailer can hold. While opting for a compact trailer may be desirable, it isn’t always the best idea for this very reason. Being restricted with what you can tow along with your trailer can be frustrating. Be sure to avoid this frustration by having all the facts before you make your purchase.
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq, Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᔭᖅ) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood, as many of the areas of their construction were treeless. Archaeologists have found evidence indicating that kayaks are at least 4000 years old.[1] The oldest still existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich.[citation needed]
Recreational kayaks are designed for the casual paddler interested in fishing, photography, or a peaceful paddle on a lake, flatwater stream or protected salt water away from strong ocean waves. These boats presently make up the largest segment of kayak sales. Compared to other kayaks, recreational kayaks have a larger cockpit for easier entry and exit and a wider beam (27–36 inches (69–91 cm)) for more stability. They are generally less than 12 feet (3.7 m) in length and have limited cargo capacity. Less expensive materials like polyethylene and fewer options keep these boats relatively inexpensive. Most canoe/kayak clubs offer introductory instruction in recreational boats. They do not perform as well in the sea. The recreational kayak is usually a type of touring kayak.
What gear do you need before you embark? Paddles and life jackets to be sure, but how about getting your kayak from the garage to the water? Dollies and car racks designed specifically for kayaks are the answer. And, when you’re out on the water, how about a third hand? As that is not actually possible, perhaps an anchor, a rod holder and landing gear would help. We’ve got all the accessories you need for epic kayak fishing expeditions.
Length alone does not fully predict a kayak's maneuverability: a second design element is rocker, i.e. its lengthwise curvature. A heavily rockered boat curves more, shortening its effective waterline. For example, an 18-foot (5.5 m) kayak with no rocker is in the water from end to end. In contrast, the bow and stern of a rockered boat are out of the water, shortening its lengthwise waterline to only 16 ft (4.9 m). Rocker is generally most evident at the ends, and in moderation improves handling. Similarly, although a rockered whitewater boat may only be a few feet shorter than a typical recreational kayak, its waterline is far shorter and its maneuverability far greater. When surfing, a heavily rockered boat is less likely to lock into the wave as the bow and stern are still above water. A boat with less rocker cuts into the wave and makes it harder to turn while surfing.
You can strap virtually anything to a car given the right gear and thorough enough straps. The most efficient way would be to buy specialized kayak racks intended for strapping your kayak to your car. But you can strap your kayak (or two, but probably not more than two safely) with just the roof rack and cross bars. Without the cross bars, you’ll certainly lose security and driving at normal speeds with kayak(s) aboard will become a safety concern.

White water racers combine a fast, unstable lower hull portion with a flared upper hull portion to combine flat water racing speed with extra stability in open water: they are not fitted with rudders and have similar maneuverability to flat water racers. They usually require substantial skill to achieve stability, due to extremely narrow hulls. Whitewater racing kayaks, like all racing kayaks, are made to regulation lengths, usually of fiber reinforced resin (usually epoxy or polyester reinforced with Kevlar, glass fiber, carbon fiber, or some combination). This form of construction is stiffer and has a harder skin than non-reinforced plastic construction such as rotomolded polyethylene: stiffer means faster, and harder means fewer scratches and therefore also faster.
Wooden hulls don't necessarily require significant skill and handiwork, depending on how they are made. Kayaks made from thin strips of wood sheathed in fiberglass have proven successful, especially as the price of epoxy resin has decreased in recent years. A plywood, stitch and glue (S&G) doesn't need fiberglass sheathing though some builders do. Three main types are popular, especially for the home builder: Stitch & Glue, Strip-Built, and hybrids which have a stitch & glue hull and a strip-built deck.
Walter Höhn (English Hoehn) had built, developed and then tested his design for a folding kayak in the white-water rivers of Switzerland from 1924 to 1927. In 1928, on emigrating to Australia, he brought 2 of them with him, lodged a patent for the design and proceeded to manufacture them. In 1942 the Australian Director of Military operations approached him to develop them for Military use. Orders were placed and eventually a total of 1024, notably the MKII & MKIII models, were produced by him and another enterprise, based on his 1942 patent (No. 117779)[23]
Getting into your kayak from a dock involves a little more skill. Lower your kayak from the dock onto the surface of the water, making sure to keep the kayak parallel to the dock. You can keep your kayak from shifting positions by placing either end of the paddle on the kayak and the dock. As you’re sitting on the edge of the dock, lower your feet into the kayak first. Then, quickly position your body towards the front of the kayak and lower yourself into the seat.
The other primary type is the creek boat, which gets its name from its purpose: running narrow, low-volume waterways. Creekboats are longer and have far more volume than playboats, which makes them more stable, faster and higher-floating. Many paddlers use creekboats in "short boat" downriver races, and they are often seen on large rivers where their extra stability and speed may be necessary to get through rapids.
Whether you’ve been kayaking for years or just starting out in the kayak life, if you have a kayak, you need a way to transport it. In fact, there’s a good chance that you’ll often need a way to transport more than one; you’ll probably want to go with friends and family, too. At the very least, consider that at some point, you may marry or have children that share in your kayaking adventures. As time goes, it will become more and more apparent to you that you need a kayak trailer.

Kayaks were adapted for military use in the Second World War. Used mainly by British Commando and special forces, principally the Combined Operations Pilotage Parties (COPPs), the Special Boat Service and the Royal Marines Boom Patrol Detachment. The latter made perhaps the best known use of them in the Operation Frankton raid on Bordeaux harbor.[24] Both the Special Air Service (SAS) and the Special Boat Service (SBS) used kayaks for reconnaissance in the 1982 Falklands War.[25] US Navy SEALs reportedly used them at the start of Unified Task Force operations in Somalia in 1992.[26] The SBS currently use Klepper two-man folding kayaks that can be launched from surfaced submarines or carried to the surface by divers from submerged ones. They can be parachuted from transport aircraft into the ocean or dropped from the back of Chinook helicopters.[27] US Special Forces have used Kleppers but now primarily use Long Haul folding kayaks, which are made in the US.[28]
Novices often use both rudders and skegs incorrectly and often forget to pull them up in shallow water, which can cause damage. For this reason, it’s simplest to leave them undeployed. Paddling without your rudder encourages you to learn better paddling technique more quickly. And if it’s so windy that you need a skeg or rudder, you really shouldn’t be paddling without an experienced guide who can explain how to use them properly.
It is important to consider how long of a kayak your trailer will be able to accommodate for the main reason if you don’t want a lot of overhang. Having overhang on your trailer can result in your kayak not sitting as securely and can risk an accident. More than just tandem kayaks, ocean kayaks tend to be a lot longer in length as well so be sure to consider this before purchasing.
If you’re not sure if you’re quite ready for kayaking then please don’t hesitate to get in contact with us, we’d be more than happy to help you with any questions you might have.Getting ready for kayaking © Elke Lindner-Oceanwide ExpeditionsHow many times will I get to go kayaking?Kayaking is of course subject to weather and water conditions – your safety is our primary concern. That being said, any cruise with kayaking as an option tries to schedule up to four excursions.Is kayaking safe?One must take some caution when kayaking. First, you are exposed to Polar weather and sea conditions, and if you don’t dress warmly enough you might be some time before getting back to the main ship. Because you are on Polar waters there is a chance of exposure to hypothermia. For these reasons kayak excursions are limited to 14 passengers total – this number lets our accompanying guides keep track of everyone and make sure that everyone is having a good time.

The second tournament of the Hobie Bass Open Series took place a while a ago on Lake Shasta, California. Headwaters Adventures, as well as the US. Forest Service sponsored the event, which was a huge success by all accounts. A large number of spotted, largemouth, and smallmouth bass were caught over the course of the two-day, equal opportunity event, which operated under special use permit with the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Read More


Nearly all trailers can haul more than one kayak. This is a great way to transport your friend’s or family’s kayak. When hauling more than one kayak it’s important to ensure your vehicle is able to handle that much weight. Keep in mind that you not only have to factor in the weight of the kayaks but also the weight of the trailer and any other gear strapped to the trailer.
As a general rule, a longer kayak is faster: it has a higher hull speed. It can also be narrower for a given displacement, reducing the drag, and it will generally track (follow a straight line) better than a shorter kayak. On the other hand, it is less manuverable. Very long kayaks are less robust, and may be harder to store and transport.[7] Some recreational kayak makers try to maximize hull volume (weight capacity) for a given length as shorter kayaks are easier to transport and store.[12][13]
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