Although I wanted the basic trailer when I first contacted the company, I’m now glad I upgraded to one of the utility bed models. Rather than stuffing my small SUV with pedal drives, gear crates, seats, paddles and fishing tackle, I now bungee stuff beneath my kayaks. It speeds up loading, and I can rinse the salt off my kayaks and fishing gear simultaneously. Transporting salty accessories on the trailer also protects the interior of my SUV from corrosion. After hosing everything off, I just back the loaded trailer into the garage, keeping my kayaks and gear secure overnight, ready for the morning fishing trip. The bed design prevents pooling water, so gear dries quickly and very little water drips on my garage floor. [ read the entire review here 10/6/17 ]
Kayak trailers need to made of a lightweight yet durable material. This job usually goes to a specialized type of steel. Galvanized steel is not only light and strong but also rust resistant. This allows you to pull right up to the water, and even into it, to launch your kayak. Knowing that you can use your trailer the way you want will increase the amount of time you’ll use it.
Fishing kayaks have been surging in popularity. These craft allow you to move stealthily across the water without the expense, upkeep, and fuel needed for a larger boat. Fishing kayaks are designed for comfort and stability and they come with convenient features for anglers, from rod holders to livewells. The challenge with fishing kayaks is that they’re often too heavy to load onto the roof of a car or SUV. It’s common for fishing kayaks to weigh over 75 pounds and some weigh over 125 pounds!

Contemporary traditional-style kayaks trace their origins primarily to the native boats of Alaska, northern Canada, and Southwest Greenland. Wooden kayaks and fabric kayaks on wooden frames dominated the market up until the 1950s, when fiberglass boats were first introduced in the US, and inflatable rubberized fabric boats were first introduced in Europe. Rotomolded plastic kayaks first appeared in 1973, and most kayaks today are made from roto-molded polyethylene resins. The development of plastic and rubberized inflatable kayaks arguably initiated the development of freestyle kayaking as we see it today, since these boats could be made smaller, stronger and more resilient than fiberglass boats.
Thanks to Wali for his excerpt from the Idiot’s Guide. How? Poke large hole(s) in your perfectly good Kayak and set it in place with some stick-um and screws. Seriously though, it really is about that simple. A 2 1/4″ hole saw works real well to poke the hole and I like 3m 4200 as a sealant. Don’t drill the screw holes until you put the holder in place and rotate it to the position you want your rod to point in and it fits inside your hull (I shortened mine some). Be careful and don’t over tighten the screws […]
The size of the trailer tongue is the distance between the axle and the hitch. Why does this matter? It matters because it determines what type of trailer to get in conjunction to the size of kayak you have.  If you have a longer Sea Kayak or even a tandem you will want a longer trailer tongue length. On the contrary if you have a shorter kayak like a recreational sized yak then you can get away with a shorter tongue length.
In the 1950s, fiberglass kayaks were developed and commonly used, until 1980s when polyethylene plastic kayaks were introduced. Kayaking progressed as a fringe sport in the U.S. until the 1970s, when it became a mainstream popular sport. Now, more than 10 white water kayaking events are featured in the Olympics.[7] While kayaking represents a key international watersport, few academic studies have (to date) been conducted on the role kayaking plays in the lives and activities of the public [8]
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