Primary (sometimes called initial) stability describes how much a boat tips, or rocks back and forth, when displaced from level by paddler weight shifts. Secondary stability describes how stable a kayak feels when put on edge or when waves are passing under the hull perpendicular to the length of the boat. For kayak rolling, tertiary stability, or the stability of an upside-down kayak, is also important (lower tertiary stability makes rolling up easier).

Is it time to think about getting a kayak trailer? If you just bought a kayak (congratulations!), you may have come to the quick realization that getting it from your home to the water looked a lot easier in the brochure. You may have tried roof racks, cam straps or even stuffing it into your buddies hatchback – nothing working quite how you had envisioned it. Kayak manufacturers have focused on stability and performance in their recent designs, often sacrificing portability. The result has been a kayak that is great on the water but not great to get to the water! Our favorite way to make your time with your new boat feel less like a CrossFit workout and more like the brochure is a kayak trailer!
If you tip in calm waters, flip the kayak over by grabbing both sides of the cockpit and climb back in if you are able. If you are unable to do this, grab the kayak and swim back to shore or shallow water. If your kayak tips while you’re in a current, hold the kayak with just one arm. Continue to face upward to ensure you can breathe. Keep your body horizontal to the surface of the water and backstroke to the shore or shallower water.

Getting into your kayak from the shore is much easier, especially for those who are learning to kayak. Whether it’s a lakeside, sea shore or riverfront, the best way to begin is to move the kayak as close to the shoreline as possible. You can then sit in the kayak and use your arms to push yourself into the water until you are floating on the surface. If you’re concerned about scratching your hull on the ground, move the kayak into the shallow water and climb in there.
Recreational kayaks are designed for the casual paddler interested in fishing, photography, or a peaceful paddle on a lake, flatwater stream or protected salt water away from strong ocean waves. These boats presently make up the largest segment of kayak sales. Compared to other kayaks, recreational kayaks have a larger cockpit for easier entry and exit and a wider beam (27–36 inches (69–91 cm)) for more stability. They are generally less than 12 feet (3.7 m) in length and have limited cargo capacity. Less expensive materials like polyethylene and fewer options keep these boats relatively inexpensive. Most canoe/kayak clubs offer introductory instruction in recreational boats. They do not perform as well in the sea. The recreational kayak is usually a type of touring kayak.
The other primary type is the creek boat, which gets its name from its purpose: running narrow, low-volume waterways. Creekboats are longer and have far more volume than playboats, which makes them more stable, faster and higher-floating. Many paddlers use creekboats in "short boat" downriver races, and they are often seen on large rivers where their extra stability and speed may be necessary to get through rapids.
Tires. If you plan on getting a truck trailer, then of course you’ll want to have tires that are road ready. You’ll want to make sure the tread isn’t worn and there are no leaks or punctures. If you have a hand trailer, you may want to consider the type of water you’ll be putting your kayak in. If you’re planning on going to the beach, then keep in mind some tires work better in sand than others. Likewise, the lake may have a muddy entrance that you could plan ahead for with more hearty tires.

The second tournament of the Hobie Bass Open Series took place a while a ago on Lake Shasta, California. Headwaters Adventures, as well as the US. Forest Service sponsored the event, which was a huge success by all accounts. A large number of spotted, largemouth, and smallmouth bass were caught over the course of the two-day, equal opportunity event, which operated under special use permit with the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Read More

Hypothetical cross-sections of kayaks. Left to right: High primary stability but low secondary stability, lower primary stability but ~same secondary stability, lower primary but higher secondary stability, two extra chines, four extra chines. More chines (angles) give a more rounded profile, decreasing stability, tracking, and the wetted area, and increasing speed.
When it’s windy, or when paddling up-current, it takes a lot of effort to make any headway, much less fish. In these situations, use the minimal draft of your kayak to your advantage. Instead of paddling right down the middle of the river or lake, get as shallow as you can. The current is much less in super skinny water, and wind and waves are also mitigated by shoreline vegetation and structures, you’ll paddle more efficiently, and you’re going to have much more energy once you get to your honey hole.
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If you tip in calm waters, flip the kayak over by grabbing both sides of the cockpit and climb back in if you are able. If you are unable to do this, grab the kayak and swim back to shore or shallow water. If your kayak tips while you’re in a current, hold the kayak with just one arm. Continue to face upward to ensure you can breathe. Keep your body horizontal to the surface of the water and backstroke to the shore or shallower water.
Once you’ve mastered how to kayak as a beginner, you may want to enhance your skill level and eventually take on whitewater kayaking. We don’t blame you — whitewater kayaking can be an exhilarating experience that allows you to view nature from a perspective like no other. If you get to the point where you’d like to consider taking on this challenge, here are a few whitewater kayaking tips you should know:
One of the most common uses of kayaks for hobbyists is whitewater kayaking. Whitewater kayaking is when a kayaker traverses down a series of rapids. The difficulty of these rapid ranges from Class I to Class VI. The difficulty of rapids often changes with water level and debris in the river. Debris that inhibits a kayakers path are often called "strainers" as they "strain" out the kayakers like a colander. There are often training camps as well as man-made structures to help train kayakers.[22]
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