Fishing kayaks can be extra tricky to load on top of a typical car rack. Most kayak anglers use a kayak trailer. Kayak trailers make it easy to get your kayak to the water and at the end of the day when you are tired, it is easy to load back up and get home. A kayak trailer can also save you money in terms of gas mileage and fuel efficiency when compared to loading and hauling your kayaks on the rooftop.
It does this by its marine grade pre-galvanized frame which is also rust resistant. This is ideal for those who venture into the ocean as you will not have to worry about corrosion. Even their wheels are galvanized so you can drive the trailer right into to the water. This means that you will no longer have to haul your kayak in and out of the water. Malone even includes a spare tire for you which will help keep you safe. You will find that this package even includes J-style kayak saddles to make attaching your kayaks even easier. This user friendly package comes with clear instructions to make building this trailer easier.
The Yakima Rack and Roll Trailer has a shock absorbing system that’s the same style as a full sized motorcycle, making the ride smoother for your kayaks and them less likely to be damaged by any of the bumps or knocks that come with any road trip. Because the cross bars are compatible with any Yakima product (and others, if the reviews are to be believed; though they don’t advertise that), you can use this for more than your kayaks, too. You can even secure a cargo carrier next to your kayak, or a bike or two! (Just be careful on the weight.)

Are you ready to get out onto the water and begin your kayaking adventures? At EZ Dock, we’re confident that with a little practice, you’ll be on your way to mastering your new hobby. We want to help make your kayaking experience as smooth as possible with our residential kayak launches. Unlike wooden docks, our EZ Kayak Launch won’t splinter or peel and is durable enough to endure extreme weather conditions.


Some modern boats vary considerably from a traditional design but still claim the title "kayak", for instance in eliminating the cockpit by seating the paddler on top of the boat ("sit-on-top" kayaks); having inflated air chambers surrounding the boat; replacing the single hull by twin hulls, and replacing paddles with other human-powered propulsion methods, such as foot-powered rotational propellers and "flippers". Kayaks are also being sailed, as well as propelled by means of small electric motors, and even by outboard gas engines.
Kayaking is a versatile watersport is a great way to spend quality time with friends and family while exploring nature from a new point of view. The EZ Dock family is full of water enthusiasts who have fallen in love with the adventure that an afternoon of kayaking offers. If you’re looking for a fun and exciting way to enjoy the open water, kayaking just may be the perfect new hobby for you. To get started, we’ve pulled together the tips and tricks we believe beginning kayakers should know.
When it’s windy, or when paddling up-current, it takes a lot of effort to make any headway, much less fish. In these situations, use the minimal draft of your kayak to your advantage. Instead of paddling right down the middle of the river or lake, get as shallow as you can. The current is much less in super skinny water, and wind and waves are also mitigated by shoreline vegetation and structures, you’ll paddle more efficiently, and you’re going to have much more energy once you get to your honey hole.
Many a conversation have taken place as to whether you should build your own DIY kayak trailer or buy a manufactured one. If you are mechanically-inclined enough to rig or weld your Harbor Freight trailer into a taller, leveled, multi-kayak device, go for it! But for many of us who prefer to spend our time on the water and in our kayaks, having a high-quality trailer that we can back up to, hook up, and go is all the work we need. The expert brands that make trailers these days have been through enough iterations to have a perfect product for all levels of paddlers.

The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. The cockpit is sometimes covered by a spray deck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray, differentiating the craft from a canoe. The spray deck makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler.


Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. It is distinguished from canoeing by the sitting position of the paddler and the number of blades on the paddle. A kayak is a low-to-the-water, canoe-like boat in which the paddler sits facing forward, legs in front, using a double-bladed paddle to pull front-to-back on one side and then the other in rotation.[1] Most kayaks have closed decks, although sit-on-top and inflatable kayaks are growing in popularity as well.[2]
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