Kayaks come in very different shapes and sizes, what you need in a kayak trailer depends on whether you’re hauling whitewater, sea, touring or fishing kayaks. GO and GO Easy Adventure Trailers were designed to accommodate all types of boats. In our photo gallery, you can see examples of different types of kayaks and how they fit—although the possibilities certainly don’t stop there!
You can kayak in any body of water: Our wonderful world is full of diverse environments which can be explored from the seat of your kayak. With portable equipment that can be easily launched from any dock, riverside or shore, your kayak can travel with you to some of the most beautiful destinations in the world. River, lakes, oceans and more — your possibilities for exploring are endless.
After you've explored kayak trailers for sale on Academy.com, prepare for your time on the water with other essential kayak gear, including paddles and other accessories. Start by transporting your boats from your trailer to the water with the help of kayak carts, which eliminate the hassle of carrying your kayak on your own. Ready to push off? Make sure you're wearing a high-quality life vest with plenty of padding and secure buckles.
Immerse yourself in the fresh air with sit-on-top kayaks that let you sit on top of the kayak rather than in a cockpit. Paddle keepers, rod holders and swivel rod holders make sit-on-top designs ideal for fishing kayaks, and padded seats allow you to lean back comfortably as you cast out your line and wait for a big catch. Fishing kayaks offer durability and storage space for all your gear.
A: Most kayaks aren’t meant to be locked onto a trailer. You can attach a lock to the strapping system found on most kayak trailers but this will only slow down people looking to steal your gear. This can be ok for a short term stop but we strongly suggest that you don’t leave your car unattended with anything on your trailer. You should do your shopping and prepare for the trip beforehand.
A wheeled carrier that will haul your kayak for you is a kayak trailer. You will either attach it to your vehicle, (Car, truck, SUV – whatever you have that will take the weight) or you will pull it yourself. (Whereas you become the vehicle that hauls it, but you do it more easily than dragging it on your own.) You could also attach one to your bike and allow it to pull for you. Often kayaks carriers intended for your bike can double as hand trailers, too. Kayak trailers will haul your kayaks great distances (on a truck or perhaps bike trailer) or just help you in getting the kayak into the water (like a hand trailer that will let you transport the kayak shorter distances.)
What gear do you need before you embark? Paddles and life jackets to be sure, but how about getting your kayak from the garage to the water? Dollies and car racks designed specifically for kayaks are the answer. And, when you’re out on the water, how about a third hand? As that is not actually possible, perhaps an anchor, a rod holder and landing gear would help. We’ve got all the accessories you need for epic kayak fishing expeditions.
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Before you learn how to ride in a kayak, you first need to learn how to get in and out of a kayak. Getting in and out of a kayak can be tricky, but we’re confident that after a little practice, you’ll catch on quickly. Put simply, there are two different ways which you will likely enter a kayak — getting into a kayak on land or in shallow depths of water, or getting into one that’s already in deeper water. Both options have their advantages and challenges.
Kickstand. If you’re shopping for a hand trailer that you’ll be operating by (obviously) hand, you will want to look into the ease of use and one of the biggest operating conveniences is a kickstand. By utilizing a kickstand (like with your bike) you’ll be able to take your hands off your kayak without it falling to the ground. That means you can run to the bathroom, get your life vest on, or just high-five your bro without damaging your kayak.
Contemporary kayaks can be equipped with after-market fishing accessories such as anchor trolleys, rod holders, electronic fish-finders and live-bait containers. Kayak anglers target highly prized gamefish like snook, red drum, seatrout, tarpon, halibut and cod and also pelagics like amberjacks, tuna, sailfish, wahoo, king mackerel, and even marlin.
Kayaks[3] were created thousands of years ago by the Inuit, formerly known as Eskimos, of the northern Arctic regions. They used driftwood and sometimes the skeleton of whale, to construct the frame of the kayak, and animal skin, particularly seal skin was used to create the body. The main purpose for creating the kayak, which literally translates to "hunter's boat" was for hunting and fishing.[4] The kayak's stealth capabilities allowed for the hunter to sneak up behind animals on the shoreline and successfully catch their prey.
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