A hand trailer is one that you will push or pull yourself. It’s intended to get your kayak into the water with ease. For example, a more popular spot to put into the river will often have substantial traffic and backing your truck into the “loading zone” will likely not be possible. (Especially if the river has a bit of a drop off, like most do). You will likely park a bit of a trek from the water and getting your kayak there will be all the easier of you have a portable conveyance that will allow you to roll the kayak to the water. A bike trailer is often one that will operate as a hand trailer, but also attach to your bike so that you can travel greater distances. If you plan on biking to your destination to start your kayaking trek, then you’ll want to look into a bike trailer that will also allow you to operate it as a hand trailer, too.
Stitch & Glue designs typically use modern, marine-grade plywood — eighth-inch, 3 millimetres (0.12 in) or up to quarter-inch, 5 millimetres (0.20 in) thick. After cutting out the required pieces of hull and deck (kits often have these pre-cut), a series of small holes are drilled along the edges. Copper wire is then used to "stitch" the pieces together through the holes. After the pieces are temporarily stitched together, they are glued with epoxy and the seams reinforced with fiberglass. When the epoxy dries, the copper stitches are removed. Sometimes the entire boat is then covered in fiberglass for additional strength and waterproofing though this adds greatly to the weight and is unnecessary. Construction is fairly straightforward, but because plywood does not bend to form compound curves, design choices are limited. This is a good choice for the first-time kayak builder as the labor and skills required (especially for kit versions) is considerably less than for strip-built boats which can take 3 times as long to build.

Sprint kayak is a sport held on calm water. Crews or individuals race over 200 m, 500 m, 1000 m or 5000 m with the winning boat being the first to cross the finish line. The paddler is seated, facing forward, and uses a double-bladed paddle pulling the blade through the water on alternate sides to propel the boat forward. In competition the number of paddlers within a boat is indicated by a figure besides the type of boat; K1 signifies an individual kayak race, K2 pairs, and K4 four-person crews. Kayak sprint has been in every summer olympics since it debuted at the 1936 summer olympics.[22] Racing is governed by the International Canoe Federation.

By the mid-1800s the kayak became increasingly popular and the Europeans became interested. German and French men began kayaking for sport. In 1931, Adolf Anderle was the first person to kayak down the Salzachöfen Gorge, which is believed to be the birthplace of modern-day white-water kayaking.[6] Kayak races were introduced in the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936.
×