We offer the best Trinity River kayaking trips on 22 miles of the Elm Fork of the Trinity River. Choose your adventure from Lake Lewisville Dam to California Crossing Dam.  All kayaking trips begin at our location on the river in Coppell, Texas.  We give you a paddle orientation and get you on the water quickly and safely.  At the end of your trip we will shuttle you back to our location.  If you’ve forgotten any essentials for the trip – sun-screen, water, etc. – you can pick these up at our Beer and Bait Store.
6) Want to get a great shot of your catch? Get a mount for your camera (Yak Attack or Yak Gear). Attach some fish grips to a T-Reign retractor tether. When you catch that big’un, slap it on the tethered fish grips and let it chill in the water while you get your camera all set up. Press the timer setting and when the camera gets ready to shoot, pull your fish up and it will be fresh for the photo.
Kayaks come in very different shapes and sizes, what you need in a kayak trailer depends on whether you’re hauling whitewater, sea, touring or fishing kayaks. GO and GO Easy Adventure Trailers were designed to accommodate all types of boats. In our photo gallery, you can see examples of different types of kayaks and how they fit—although the possibilities certainly don’t stop there!
Only one hour from Washington DC on the Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia border, River & Trail offers the convenience of camping on the Potomac River, where many of our trips begin. For those people who have enjoyed the beauty and challenge of whitewater rafting, canoeing or kayaking affords a more personal experience with your boat, your companion, and the river.
Stitch & Glue designs typically use modern, marine-grade plywood — eighth-inch, 3 millimetres (0.12 in) or up to quarter-inch, 5 millimetres (0.20 in) thick. After cutting out the required pieces of hull and deck (kits often have these pre-cut), a series of small holes are drilled along the edges. Copper wire is then used to "stitch" the pieces together through the holes. After the pieces are temporarily stitched together, they are glued with epoxy and the seams reinforced with fiberglass. When the epoxy dries, the copper stitches are removed. Sometimes the entire boat is then covered in fiberglass for additional strength and waterproofing though this adds greatly to the weight and is unnecessary. Construction is fairly straightforward, but because plywood does not bend to form compound curves, design choices are limited. This is a good choice for the first-time kayak builder as the labor and skills required (especially for kit versions) is considerably less than for strip-built boats which can take 3 times as long to build.
Kayak diving is a type of recreational diving where the divers paddle to a diving site in a kayak carrying all their gear to the place they want to dive. The range can be up to several kilometres along the coastline from the launching point to a place where access would be difficult from the shore, although the sea is sheltered. It is a considerably cheaper alternative to using a powered boat, as well as combining the experience of sea kayaking at the same time. Kayak diving gives the diver independence from dive boat operators, while allowing dives at sites which are too far to comfortably swim, but are sufficiently sheltered.[17]

These manufacturers offer special models for fishing that are designed and accessorized for this sport, including specially designed hatches, built-in coolers & rod holders, gps receivers and equipment mounts. Other accessories include live wells, anchor trolleys and running lights. Specially designed fishing kayaks usually have designs similar to those of recreational sit-in and sit-on-top kayaks characterized by very wide beams (up to 36 inches) that increase lateral stability. The increases stability allows for the angler to stand up and fish on the kayak. These kayaks provide a considerable space for storage inside their hulls which allow the angler to stow rods, fishing gear, batteries for fish finders, extra paddles, anchors, and wheels to tow the kayak from vehicle to the water. The cutouts molded into the top of the kayaks are well-suited to hold milk crates with additional supplies. Some anglers equip their fishing kayaks with outriggers to further increase stability.[3] In recent years people have begun using kayaks for fly fishing, most models suited for upright fly casting include upright braces that allow you to safely stand up.[4]
One of the most common uses of kayaks for hobbyists is whitewater kayaking. Whitewater kayaking is when a kayaker traverses down a series of rapids. The difficulty of these rapid ranges from Class I to Class VI. The difficulty of rapids often changes with water level and debris in the river. Debris that inhibits a kayakers path are often called "strainers" as they "strain" out the kayakers like a colander. There are often training camps as well as man-made structures to help train kayakers.[22]
Novices often use both rudders and skegs incorrectly and often forget to pull them up in shallow water, which can cause damage. For this reason, it’s simplest to leave them undeployed. Paddling without your rudder encourages you to learn better paddling technique more quickly. And if it’s so windy that you need a skeg or rudder, you really shouldn’t be paddling without an experienced guide who can explain how to use them properly.
Contemporary traditional-style kayaks trace their origins primarily to the native boats of Alaska, northern Canada, and Southwest Greenland. Wooden kayaks and fabric kayaks on wooden frames dominated the market up until the 1950s, when fiberglass boats were first introduced in the US, and inflatable rubberized fabric boats were first introduced in Europe. Rotomolded plastic kayaks first appeared in 1973, and most kayaks today are made from roto-molded polyethylene resins. The development of plastic and rubberized inflatable kayaks arguably initiated the development of freestyle kayaking as we see it today, since these boats could be made smaller, stronger and more resilient than fiberglass boats.
Thanks to Wali for his excerpt from the Idiot’s Guide. How? Poke large hole(s) in your perfectly good Kayak and set it in place with some stick-um and screws. Seriously though, it really is about that simple. A 2 1/4″ hole saw works real well to poke the hole and I like 3m 4200 as a sealant. Don’t drill the screw holes until you put the holder in place and rotate it to the position you want your rod to point in and it fits inside your hull (I shortened mine some). Be careful and don’t over tighten the screws […]

The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. The cockpit is sometimes covered by a spray deck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray, differentiating the craft from a canoe. The spray deck makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler.

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