Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq, Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᔭᖅ) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood, as many of the areas of their construction were treeless. Archaeologists have found evidence indicating that kayaks are at least 4000 years old.[1] The oldest still existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich.[citation needed]

One of the most important questions that you need to start with is: how many kayaks in your fleet will you need to haul at once? If it is just you and your spouse or you and a couple of comrades, then one of the roof-rack style or micro trailers is perfect. You might find that a 4-6 place kayak trailer will ensure you can transport the whole family or maybe your groups are 8, 10, or more deep!


This is the best 4 kayak trailer that can hold up to 4 kayaks. Like most trailers on our list this one is made from marine grade galvanized steel. The frame is a T-Box design that uses a leaf spring suspension system. You won’t have to worry about the axle as it’s also galvanized and heavy duty. The wheels are on the smaller size at 8 inches but can still carry up to 4 full sized kayaks, stand up paddle boards or even canoes weighing up to 275 lbs. Your gear will rest on foam blocks included with this trailer.
Before you learn how to ride in a kayak, you first need to learn how to get in and out of a kayak. Getting in and out of a kayak can be tricky, but we’re confident that after a little practice, you’ll catch on quickly. Put simply, there are two different ways which you will likely enter a kayak — getting into a kayak on land or in shallow depths of water, or getting into one that’s already in deeper water. Both options have their advantages and challenges.

What gear do you need before you embark? Paddles and life jackets to be sure, but how about getting your kayak from the garage to the water? Dollies and car racks designed specifically for kayaks are the answer. And, when you’re out on the water, how about a third hand? As that is not actually possible, perhaps an anchor, a rod holder and landing gear would help. We’ve got all the accessories you need for epic kayak fishing expeditions.


A specialized variant of racing craft called a surf ski has an open cockpit and can be up to 21 feet (6.4 m) long but only 18 inches (46 cm) wide, requiring expert balance and paddling skill. Surf skis were originally created for surf and are still used in races in New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa. They have become popular in the United States for ocean races, lake races and even downriver races.
Traditional-style and some modern types of kayaks (e.g. sit-on-top) require that paddler be seated with their legs stretched in front of them, in a right angle, in a position called the "L" kayaking position. Other kayaks offer a different sitting position, in which the paddler's legs are not stretched out in front of them, and the thigh brace bears more on the inside than the top of the thighs (see diagram).
Kayak diving is a type of recreational diving where the divers paddle to a diving site in a kayak carrying all their gear to the place they want to dive. The range can be up to several kilometres along the coastline from the launching point to a place where access would be difficult from the shore, although the sea is sheltered. It is a considerably cheaper alternative to using a powered boat, as well as combining the experience of sea kayaking at the same time. Kayak diving gives the diver independence from dive boat operators, while allowing dives at sites which are too far to comfortably swim, but are sufficiently sheltered.[17]
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