Use Google Earth or other online sources to scout out small non-motor lakes, streams and rivers. One of the best things about kayak fishing is the ability to get on water that isn’t crowded with boaters. Pay attention to where ramp and entry points are located, as well as where some prime fishing spots may be. Doing this will help you save time, stay safe and will increase your chances of catching some fish!
Traditional multi-hull vessels such as catamarans and outrigger canoes benefit from increased lateral stability without sacrificing speed, and these advantages have been successfully applied in twin hull kayaks. Outrigger kayaks attach one or two smaller hulls to the main hull to enhance stability, especially for fishing, touring, kayak sailing and motorized kayaking. Twin hull kayaks feature two long and narrow hulls, and since all their buoyancy is distributed as far as possible from their center line, they are stabler than mono hull kayaks outfitted with outriggers.

^ There is scant evidence of Ainu peoples using the classic kayak design in prehistoric times. The following indicates that they did use skin-covered vessels, however: "Like the yara chisei, bark houses, … yara chip, bark boats, were probably substitutes for the skin-covered boat, elsewhere surviving in the coracle and kayak. Skin-covered boats … are referred to in old [Ainu] traditions. -Ainu material culture from the notes of N. G. Munro: in the archive of the Royal Anthropological Institute, British Museum, Department of Ethnography, 1994, p. 33
I am an avid outdoorsman with experience in naturalist education, outside adventure education, ski instruction, and writing. In addition to my outdoor hobbies, I’m a huge fan of punk rock. I have launched several start-ups. (or business ventures) When exploring the backcountry, I usually carry less than 10 pounds of gear. Years of experience have taught me to pack light. I enjoy sharing my experiences of backcountry education teaching and guiding through writing.
Is it time to think about getting a kayak trailer? If you just bought a kayak (congratulations!), you may have come to the quick realization that getting it from your home to the water looked a lot easier in the brochure. You may have tried roof racks, cam straps or even stuffing it into your buddies hatchback – nothing working quite how you had envisioned it. Kayak manufacturers have focused on stability and performance in their recent designs, often sacrificing portability. The result has been a kayak that is great on the water but not great to get to the water! Our favorite way to make your time with your new boat feel less like a CrossFit workout and more like the brochure is a kayak trailer!
Getting into your kayak from a dock involves a little more skill. Lower your kayak from the dock onto the surface of the water, making sure to keep the kayak parallel to the dock. You can keep your kayak from shifting positions by placing either end of the paddle on the kayak and the dock. As you’re sitting on the edge of the dock, lower your feet into the kayak first. Then, quickly position your body towards the front of the kayak and lower yourself into the seat.
There are many types of kayaks used in flat water and whitewater kayaking. The sizes and shapes vary drastically depending on what type of water to be paddled on and also what the paddler would like to do. The second set of essentials for kayaking is an off-set paddle where the paddle blades are tilted to help reduce wind resistance while the other blade is being used in the water. These vary in length and also shape depending on the intended use, height of the paddler, and the paddler's preference. Kayaks should be equipped with one or more buoyancy aid (also called flotation) which creates air space that helps prevent a kayak from sinking when filled with water. A life jacket should be worn at all times (also called a personal flotation device or PFD), and a helmet is also often required for most kayaking and is mandatory for white water kayaking.[11][12] Various other pieces of safety gear include a whistle for signaling for help; throwing ropes to help rescue other kayakers; and, a diving knife and appropriate water shoes should used depending upon the risks the water and terrain pose. Proper clothing such as a dry suit, wetsuit or spray top also help protect kayakers from cold water or air temperatures.[13]
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