Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq (ᖃᔭᖅ Inuktitut pronunciation: [qɑˈjɑq]), Yup'ik: qayaq (from qai- "surface; top"),[2] Aleut: Iqyax) were originally developed by the Inuit, Yup'ik, and Aleut. They used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched seal or other animal skins stretched over a wood or whalebone-skeleton frame. (Western Alaskan Natives used wood whereas the eastern Inuit used whalebone due to the treeless landscape). Kayaks are believed to be at least 4,000 years old. The oldest existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich, with the oldest dating from 1577.[3]
The instructions for how you get out of a kayak are easy to remember — just complete the steps in reverse. When exiting on the shore, paddle your kayak into shallow water or as close to the land as possible. Swing your legs out of the kayak, gain your footing and stand up. When exiting the kayak on a dock, turn your body to face the dock and pull yourself out of the kayak.

This is the basic turning stroke. If you do repeated forward strokes on the same side of the boat, you’ll notice that the boat slowly turns the other way. The sweep stroke simply exaggerates this effect. The sweep is the same as a forward stroke, except that you alter the blade path so that it carves a much wider arc on the side of the boat. Sweep strokes on the right side of the boat will turn the boat left and left-side sweep strokes will turn the boat right.
FishUSA now offers fishing kayaks, which are designed from the water up for anglers and their equipment. These modern kayaks differ from the original hunting kayaks of the Arctic in many ways. Instead of stretching skins or other material over an internal frame, modern kayaks are roto-molded in durable plastics. Polyethylene resins are used to make a hard, hollow shell to support the angler, as well as a wide range of accessories, while also being a bit flexible and impact resistant. Modern fishing kayaks typically do not feature an enclosed compartment like their predecessors did. Due to the physical actions of paddling a low-profile boat while needing access to all equipment at a moment’s notice, the standard design referred to as “sit-on-top” is the preferred style for fishing kayaks. The angler sits on top of the hollow shell which is designed to be in contact with the lower back, legs and feet of the paddler to gain maneuverability while remaining stable. Built-in dry storage compartments and other features allow for storage of tackle, provisions and other items you would want to keep dry. Some fishing kayaks even have live bait compartments built right into the shell.
When it’s windy, or when paddling up-current, it takes a lot of effort to make any headway, much less fish. In these situations, use the minimal draft of your kayak to your advantage. Instead of paddling right down the middle of the river or lake, get as shallow as you can. The current is much less in super skinny water, and wind and waves are also mitigated by shoreline vegetation and structures, you’ll paddle more efficiently, and you’re going to have much more energy once you get to your honey hole.
Traditional kayaks encompass three types: Baidarkas, from the Bering sea & Aleutian islands, the oldest design, whose rounded shape and numerous chines give them an almost Blimp-like appearance; West Greenland kayaks, with fewer chines and a more angular shape, with gunwales rising to a point at the bow and stern; and East Greenland kayaks that appear similar to the West Greenland style, but often fit more snugly to the paddler and possess a steeper angle between gunwale and stem, which lends maneuverability.
Be sure to always check the length restrictions that your trailer will have. You do not want to be driving down the road with a ton of overhang from your kayak. Typically speaking the length of your trailer tongue will determine the length of a kayak trailer can hold. While opting for a compact trailer may be desirable, it isn’t always the best idea for this very reason. Being restricted with what you can tow along with your trailer can be frustrating. Be sure to avoid this frustration by having all the facts before you make your purchase.
FOR THE PERSON THAT HAS MORE THAN 1 CANOE, KAYAK OR SMALL BOAT. THIS UNIT HAS 250 POUND CAPACITY AND WILL HOLD 2 CANOES OR UP TO 4 KAYAKS. IT HAS ADJUSTABLE 72" WIDE CROSSBARS (FRONT TO REAR) AND A FULLY ADJUSTABLE AXLE, FOR TONGUE WEIGHT. ADJUSTABLE TIE DOWN LOOPS (6) ARE ALSO STANDARD. THE PERFECT "FAMILY TRAILER". IT IS 14' 11" LONG AND 72" WIDE (AT THE CROSSBARS). 1 7/8" BALL COUPLER
One of the most common uses of kayaks for hobbyists is whitewater kayaking. Whitewater kayaking is when a kayaker traverses down a series of rapids. The difficulty of these rapid ranges from Class I to Class VI. The difficulty of rapids often changes with water level and debris in the river. Debris that inhibits a kayakers path are often called "strainers" as they "strain" out the kayakers like a colander. There are often training camps as well as man-made structures to help train kayakers.[22]
As a general rule, a longer kayak is faster: it has a higher hull speed. It can also be narrower for a given displacement, reducing the drag, and it will generally track (follow a straight line) better than a shorter kayak. On the other hand, it is less manuverable. Very long kayaks are less robust, and may be harder to store and transport.[7] Some recreational kayak makers try to maximize hull volume (weight capacity) for a given length as shorter kayaks are easier to transport and store.[12][13]
Unique to all the sites that followed, anglers can still reach a guide (or pro-staffer) directly through Kayakfishing.com.  By phone, email or text.   A handful of kayak fishing experts, including writers, guides and exceptionally talented kayak anglers in all the fisheries, have been fielding inquiries from anglers for 20 years.  Ranging from “Which kayak should I buy” to “Which knot should I tie…..and a lot of “How do I catch ________”, it’s a great way to meet kayak anglers and we look forward to hooking up with you anytime.
Kickstand. If you’re shopping for a hand trailer that you’ll be operating by (obviously) hand, you will want to look into the ease of use and one of the biggest operating conveniences is a kickstand. By utilizing a kickstand (like with your bike) you’ll be able to take your hands off your kayak without it falling to the ground. That means you can run to the bathroom, get your life vest on, or just high-five your bro without damaging your kayak.
Modern kayaks serve diverse purposes, ranging from slow and easy touring on placid water, to racing and complex maneuvering in fast-moving whitewater, to fishing and long-distance ocean excursions. Modern forms, materials and construction techniques make it possible to effectively serve these needs while continuing to leverage the insights of the original Arctic inventors.
After you've explored kayak trailers for sale on Academy.com, prepare for your time on the water with other essential kayak gear, including paddles and other accessories. Start by transporting your boats from your trailer to the water with the help of kayak carts, which eliminate the hassle of carrying your kayak on your own. Ready to push off? Make sure you're wearing a high-quality life vest with plenty of padding and secure buckles.

You can kayak virtually anywhere in the world with a large enough body of water. Unlike some other vessels, you can strap a kayak to the roof of your car and head out on a new adventure. You can explore calm lakes, river rapids, quiet creeks and serene seas. One of the greatest advantages of kayaking is you can have an exciting journey across the water both near and far. Here are just a few destinations where we suggest you remember to pack your paddle:


1) You do not need to buy a top of the line kayak, but you do need to talk to some experienced people about the best kind of kayak for the water you plan to be fishing, combined with your height/weight and paddling ability. I see articles stating that you can start with a $200 kayak. That’s true, for some folks. But I’ve fielded a lot of phone calls from people who bought big box store kayaks that can’t carry their weight. It helps to talk to people who know kayaks, before you buy.
Getting into your kayak from the shore is much easier, especially for those who are learning to kayak. Whether it’s a lakeside, sea shore or riverfront, the best way to begin is to move the kayak as close to the shoreline as possible. You can then sit in the kayak and use your arms to push yourself into the water until you are floating on the surface. If you’re concerned about scratching your hull on the ground, move the kayak into the shallow water and climb in there.
The sea kayak, though descended directly from traditional types, is implemented in a variety of materials. Sea kayaks typically have a longer waterline, and provisions for below-deck storage of cargo. Sea kayaks may also have rudders or skegs (fixed rudder) and upturned bow or stern profiles for wave shedding. Modern sea kayaks usually have two or more internal bulkheads. Some models can accommodate two or sometimes three paddlers.
Folding kayaks are direct descendants of the skin-on-frame boats used by the Inuit and Greenlandic peoples. Modern folding kayaks are constructed from a wooden or aluminum frame over which is placed a synthetic skin made of polyester, cotton canvas, polyurethane, or Hypalon. They are more expensive than inflatable kayaks, but have the advantage of greater stiffness and consequently better seaworthiness.
If you’re looking for the best kayak car trailer this is the one for you. It is made from a lightweight yet strong galvanized steel frame which sits on 12 inch wheels. This trailer can carry everything you use in the summer including kayaks, stand up paddle boards, and bicycles. This is done by having extra long crossbars which are compatible with every roof rack style.
^ There is scant evidence of Ainu peoples using the classic kayak design in prehistoric times. The following indicates that they did use skin-covered vessels, however: "Like the yara chisei, bark houses, … yara chip, bark boats, were probably substitutes for the skin-covered boat, elsewhere surviving in the coracle and kayak. Skin-covered boats … are referred to in old [Ainu] traditions. -Ainu material culture from the notes of N. G. Munro: in the archive of the Royal Anthropological Institute, British Museum, Department of Ethnography, 1994, p. 33
Fishing kayaks have been surging in popularity. These craft allow you to move stealthily across the water without the expense, upkeep, and fuel needed for a larger boat. Fishing kayaks are designed for comfort and stability and they come with convenient features for anglers, from rod holders to livewells. The challenge with fishing kayaks is that they’re often too heavy to load onto the roof of a car or SUV. It’s common for fishing kayaks to weigh over 75 pounds and some weigh over 125 pounds!
Immerse yourself in the fresh air with sit-on-top kayaks that let you sit on top of the kayak rather than in a cockpit. Paddle keepers, rod holders and swivel rod holders make sit-on-top designs ideal for fishing kayaks, and padded seats allow you to lean back comfortably as you cast out your line and wait for a big catch. Fishing kayaks offer durability and storage space for all your gear.

This is the basic turning stroke. If you do repeated forward strokes on the same side of the boat, you’ll notice that the boat slowly turns the other way. The sweep stroke simply exaggerates this effect. The sweep is the same as a forward stroke, except that you alter the blade path so that it carves a much wider arc on the side of the boat. Sweep strokes on the right side of the boat will turn the boat left and left-side sweep strokes will turn the boat right.
One type, the playboat, is short, with a scooped bow and blunt stern. These trade speed and stability for high maneuverability. Their primary use is performing tricks in individual water features or short stretches of river. In playboating or freestyle competition (also known as rodeo boating), kayakers exploit the complex currents of rapids to execute a series of tricks, which are scored for skill and style.

The Malone XtraLight 2 Kayak Package with V style Kayak Carriers is designed to carry two kayaks (or canoes, if that better suits your fancy – or if you like the versatility of being able to use this one trailer for both). You can fit a decently wide kayak on the rack, up to 29″ width will fit comfortably in each slot. You’ll place these kayaks into the trailer bottom down and count on the extra padding to protect them.
Martin Dies, Jr. State Park Paddling Trails: Includes information about the Neches Paddling Trail, Walnut Slough Paddling Trail and Sandy Creek Paddling Trail, three trails running through and around Martin Dies, Jr. State Park that offer 3 to 16 miles of trails for a variety of experiences – from the park’s backwater sloughs and a wide open lake to a fast-moving river.
Getting into your kayak from a dock involves a little more skill. Lower your kayak from the dock onto the surface of the water, making sure to keep the kayak parallel to the dock. You can keep your kayak from shifting positions by placing either end of the paddle on the kayak and the dock. As you’re sitting on the edge of the dock, lower your feet into the kayak first. Then, quickly position your body towards the front of the kayak and lower yourself into the seat.
Stitch & Glue designs typically use modern, marine-grade plywood — eighth-inch, 3 millimetres (0.12 in) or up to quarter-inch, 5 millimetres (0.20 in) thick. After cutting out the required pieces of hull and deck (kits often have these pre-cut), a series of small holes are drilled along the edges. Copper wire is then used to "stitch" the pieces together through the holes. After the pieces are temporarily stitched together, they are glued with epoxy and the seams reinforced with fiberglass. When the epoxy dries, the copper stitches are removed. Sometimes the entire boat is then covered in fiberglass for additional strength and waterproofing though this adds greatly to the weight and is unnecessary. Construction is fairly straightforward, but because plywood does not bend to form compound curves, design choices are limited. This is a good choice for the first-time kayak builder as the labor and skills required (especially for kit versions) is considerably less than for strip-built boats which can take 3 times as long to build.
For your maximum enjoyment, we recommend that at least one person in each boat has basic paddling, river safety and steering skills. You can expect some riffles and rapids on all of our trips and rentals – rivers are not lakes and moving water requires attentive paddling. Kayak lessons and canoe lessons providing basic instruction are suggested for first timers and those looking to improve their skills. Certified guides are also available for canoe or kayak rentals for groups.

This is the basic turning stroke. If you do repeated forward strokes on the same side of the boat, you’ll notice that the boat slowly turns the other way. The sweep stroke simply exaggerates this effect. The sweep is the same as a forward stroke, except that you alter the blade path so that it carves a much wider arc on the side of the boat. Sweep strokes on the right side of the boat will turn the boat left and left-side sweep strokes will turn the boat right.
9) Hydrate. Remember that kayak fishing all day is exercise, much more so than sitting on a boat. If you go out all day, bring enough water. Nothing disorientates me like a lack of water. It’s hard to focus on figuring out a pattern for catching fish, when your brain is shriveled up like a raisin. Dehydration will make you grumpy and will just compound your frustration if the fish aren’t biting.
A wheeled carrier that will haul your kayak for you is a kayak trailer. You will either attach it to your vehicle, (Car, truck, SUV – whatever you have that will take the weight) or you will pull it yourself. (Whereas you become the vehicle that hauls it, but you do it more easily than dragging it on your own.) You could also attach one to your bike and allow it to pull for you. Often kayaks carriers intended for your bike can double as hand trailers, too. Kayak trailers will haul your kayaks great distances (on a truck or perhaps bike trailer) or just help you in getting the kayak into the water (like a hand trailer that will let you transport the kayak shorter distances.)

"Sit on top" kayaks place the paddler in an open, shallowly-concave deck above the water level. This style is usually used for non-white water activities as most find it harder to stay inside the kayak while also preventing them from "rolling" which allows the user to upright themselves if they flip over. There are some benefits to sit on tops such as the ability for a "dry hatch" these are a compartment, that usually runs the length of the kayak, which in addition to providing more buoyancy allows for the kayaker to store various equipment in. "Sit on top" kayaks often use "through holes" which allows any water that got in the boat to make it through the deck and dry hatch to drain.[14] "Cockpit style" involves sitting with the legs and hips inside the kayak hull with a spray deck or "spray skirt" that creates a water-resistant seal around the waist. There is a wide range of "cockpit style" boats which usually allow for more user control of the boat as they are able to push against the walls of the boat to tip in order to complete maneuvers. A common variant of "cockpit style" kayaks are "play boats" these are usually very short kayaks in which the user does tricks and maneuvers: "Inflatables" are a hybrid of the two previous configurations; these boats have an open deck, but the paddler sits below the level of the deck. These boats are often subject to more instability due to the way the boat sits higher in the water. They are often used in a more commercial setting, they are often affectionately called "Duckies". "Tandems" are configured for multiple paddlers, in contrast to the single person designs featured by most kayaks. Tandems can be used by two or even three paddlers[15].

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