Flight Atlanta - Fort Lauderdale (ATL - FLL) $55+ Flight Houston - Fort Lauderdale (HOU - FLL) $71+ Flight Houston - Fort Lauderdale (IAH - FLL) $71+ Flight Atlantic City - Fort Lauderdale (ACY - FLL) $100+ Flight Newark - Fort Lauderdale (EWR - FLL) $113+ Flight Denver - Fort Lauderdale (DEN - FLL) $114+ Flight Washington - Fort Lauderdale (BWI - FLL) $115+
Hoping Everyone had a Happy Holiday Season and Wishing You A Very Fishy Year in 2019!!! Come January, while many fisheries are gearing up for next season pursuits like striped bass or waiting for various fisheries to open, others appreciate winter targets.  Northern fishing lodges are long shuttered and somebody somewhere’s out there checking the ice.  Thinking back on the years, it’s clear that kayaks make the season longer for most fisheries where you don’t need an ice hut.  Beyond the Golden State, I’m seeing a lot of nice action along the Gulf for redfish and it appears, kayak bass fishing never […]
Dear Armand, thank you for your comments... we truly appreciate your feedback! These are all great comments to help us improve our product. We are sorry to hear your hitch pin was stolen off your trailer, please contact us and we can provide a replacement. The pins we use are stainless steel, rather than a standard 1/2" pin which would be zinc and prone to rusting. You also can find basic info on the trailer VIN sticker, such as tire size, GVWR, load capacity, etc... This is located on the front edge of the trailer by the tongue. Enjoy your trailer and please contact us if there is anything you need.
Traditional-style and some modern types of kayaks (e.g. sit-on-top) require that paddler be seated with their legs stretched in front of them, in a right angle, in a position called the "L" kayaking position. Other kayaks offer a different sitting position, in which the paddler's legs are not stretched out in front of them, and the thigh brace bears more on the inside than the top of the thighs (see diagram).

This is the basic turning stroke. If you do repeated forward strokes on the same side of the boat, you’ll notice that the boat slowly turns the other way. The sweep stroke simply exaggerates this effect. The sweep is the same as a forward stroke, except that you alter the blade path so that it carves a much wider arc on the side of the boat. Sweep strokes on the right side of the boat will turn the boat left and left-side sweep strokes will turn the boat right.


Tires. If you plan on getting a truck trailer, then of course you’ll want to have tires that are road ready. You’ll want to make sure the tread isn’t worn and there are no leaks or punctures. If you have a hand trailer, you may want to consider the type of water you’ll be putting your kayak in. If you’re planning on going to the beach, then keep in mind some tires work better in sand than others. Likewise, the lake may have a muddy entrance that you could plan ahead for with more hearty tires.

Entry level kayak anglers will find quality information, regional blogs with kayak fishing info and tutorials, direction to all the fisheries and a lot more in the weeks and months ahead.  After more than 20 years reaching anglers making their first searches, we’re adding resources for veteran kayak anglers too.  Pour through the site menu and feel free to contact us for info or send a fishy picture anytime along the way.
Browse our inventory of many industry leading brands, including Pelican International, Perception, Wilderness Systems, Hobie and much more. To personalize your search, filter by brand, price and activity to find the perfect kayak right here online, or shop kayaks in person from one of our many SCHEELS locations. No matter which route you choose, you can be sure to find an excellent selection of high-performing products to meet your needs and skill level. Shop SCHEELS kayaks to kick start your season of adventure.
Most of the Aleut people in the Aleutian Islands eastward to Greenland Inuit relied on the kayak for hunting a variety of prey—primarily seals, though whales and caribou were important in some areas. Skin-on-frame kayaks are still being used for hunting by Inuit people in Greenland, because the smooth and flexible skin glides silently through the waves. In other parts of the world home builders are continuing the tradition of skin on frame kayaks, usually with modern skins of canvas or synthetic fabric, such as sc. ballistic nylon.
Primary stability is often a big concern to a beginner, while secondary stability matters both to beginners and experienced travelers. By example, a wide, flat-bottomed kayak will have high primary stability and feel very stable on flat water. However, when a steep wave breaks on such a boat, it can be easily overturned because the flat bottom is no longer level. By contrast, a kayak with a narrower, more rounded hull with more hull flare can be edged or leaned into waves and (in the hands of a skilled kayaker) provides a safer, more comfortable response on stormy seas. Kayaks with only moderate primary, but excellent secondary stability are, in general, considered more seaworthy, especially in challenging conditions.
Purchased the 4x5 Paddlesport/Utility trailer in late August after searching hi and low for a suitable transport for our kayaks. We are getting too old to lift 55Lbs + kayaks on to a car roof but want to continue using them in NH. Reviewed Malone and Loadrite and decided on the Dock Doctors after considering price, quality and functionality. Used once and loved the trailer.
Flight Fort Lauderdale - Newark (FLL - EWR) $57+ Flight Chicago - New York (ORD - LGA) $117+ Flight Fort Lauderdale - New York (FLL - LGA) $123+ Flight Atlanta - Newark (ATL - EWR) $124+ Flight Chicago - New York (ORD - JFK) $127+ Flight Los Angeles - New York (LAX - LGA) $142+ Flight Chicago - Newark (ORD - EWR) $147+ Flight Miami - New York (MIA - JFK) $166+ Flight Houston - Newark (HOU - EWR) $185+ Flight Houston - New York (HOU - LGA) $186+ Flight Atlanta - New York (ATL - JFK) $187+ Flight Dallas - New York (DFW - LGA) $189+ Flight San Francisco - New York (SFO - LGA) $210+ Flight Oakland - New York (OAK - LGA) $212+ Flight Dallas - Newark (DFW - EWR) $221+
Explore the Arctic and Antarctic coastlines in a kayakOne of the best features of Polar Region cruises is that you’re never done exploring. Even if you feel you’ve walked all over the Arctic or Antarctic, climbed every mountain, and said hello to every possible penguin, there’s still another whole world to explore – the water. Polar cruise kayaking is an amazing way to slip into the white and blue beauty of the quiet oceans around you.
You might think current is a nightmare to fish in a kayak, but that’s actually far from the truth – provided you know how to use it to your advantage. Most kayaks are short and light enough to actually sit entirely in an eddy, preventing the boat from moving downstream, and giving you plenty of time to thoroughly fish the corresponding current seam. To maximize this, go past the spot you want to fish, then tuck into the eddy behind it, and fish until your heart’s content – without even having to paddle.

The second tournament of the Hobie Bass Open Series took place a while a ago on Lake Shasta, California. Headwaters Adventures, as well as the US. Forest Service sponsored the event, which was a huge success by all accounts. A large number of spotted, largemouth, and smallmouth bass were caught over the course of the two-day, equal opportunity event, which operated under special use permit with the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Read More
“Years ago I suggested on this web site, orange hand cleaner for removal of oil/tar. Spike emailed me asking that I keep an eye on the cleaned area for signs of “reactions”. I still have the OK Scrambler. The area cleaned looks the same as the rest of the kayak. I do store the kayak indoors and use “303” protectant about once per month. Perhaps the extra care has been helpful.”  Thanks to Bill Hartman, Oxnard California.
Folding kayaks are direct descendants of the skin-on-frame boats used by the Inuit and Greenlandic peoples. Modern folding kayaks are constructed from a wooden or aluminum frame over which is placed a synthetic skin made of polyester, cotton canvas, polyurethane, or Hypalon. They are more expensive than inflatable kayaks, but have the advantage of greater stiffness and consequently better seaworthiness.
Primary stability is often a big concern to a beginner, while secondary stability matters both to beginners and experienced travelers. By example, a wide, flat-bottomed kayak will have high primary stability and feel very stable on flat water. However, when a steep wave breaks on such a boat, it can be easily overturned because the flat bottom is no longer level. By contrast, a kayak with a narrower, more rounded hull with more hull flare can be edged or leaned into waves and (in the hands of a skilled kayaker) provides a safer, more comfortable response on stormy seas. Kayaks with only moderate primary, but excellent secondary stability are, in general, considered more seaworthy, especially in challenging conditions.
The sea kayak, though descended directly from traditional types, is implemented in a variety of materials. Sea kayaks typically have a longer waterline, and provisions for below-deck storage of cargo. Sea kayaks may also have rudders or skegs (fixed rudder) and upturned bow or stern profiles for wave shedding. Modern sea kayaks usually have two or more internal bulkheads. Some models can accommodate two or sometimes three paddlers.
The Australian Military MKII and MKIII folding kayaks were extensively used during the 1941-1945 Pacific War for some 33 raids and missions on and around the South-East Asian islands. Documentation for this will be found in the National Archives of Australia official records, reference No. NAA K1214-123/1/06. They were deployed from disguised watercraft, submarines, Catalina aircraft, P.T. boats, motor launches and by parachute.[29]

The Australian Military MKII and MKIII folding kayaks were extensively used during the 1941-1945 Pacific War for some 33 raids and missions on and around the South-East Asian islands. Documentation for this will be found in the National Archives of Australia official records, reference No. NAA K1214-123/1/06. They were deployed from disguised watercraft, submarines, Catalina aircraft, P.T. boats, motor launches and by parachute.[29]


The Anderson Estates $38+ Freehand Los Angeles $45+ Monterey Inn Hotel $45+ Custom Hotel Los Angeles Airport $111+ Holiday Inn Los Angeles - Lax Airport $111+ Milner Hotel $117+ Ramada by Wyndham, Los Angeles/Wilshire Center $121+ Hyatt Regency Los Angeles International Airport $125+ Hollywood Hotel - The Hotel of Hollywood $128+ Four Points by Sheraton Los Angeles International Airport $129+ La Quinta Inn & Suites LAX $131+ Crowne Plaza Los Angeles Airport $132+
Sprint kayak is a sport held on calm water. Crews or individuals race over 200 m, 500 m, 1000 m or 5000 m with the winning boat being the first to cross the finish line. The paddler is seated, facing forward, and uses a double-bladed paddle pulling the blade through the water on alternate sides to propel the boat forward. In competition the number of paddlers within a boat is indicated by a figure besides the type of boat; K1 signifies an individual kayak race, K2 pairs, and K4 four-person crews. Kayak sprint has been in every summer olympics since it debuted at the 1936 summer olympics.[22] Racing is governed by the International Canoe Federation.
Make sure the paddle blades are in line with each other. If you notice that the blades are offset from each other, your paddle may be “feathered.” If this is the case, take a minute to adjust the blades back in line via a push-button or twist setting in the center of the shaft. (Feathered blades cut through wind better, but are trickier to use for first-timers.)
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq (ᖃᔭᖅ Inuktitut pronunciation: [qɑˈjɑq]), Yup'ik: qayaq (from qai- "surface; top"),[2] Aleut: Iqyax) were originally developed by the Inuit, Yup'ik, and Aleut. They used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched seal or other animal skins stretched over a wood or whalebone-skeleton frame. (Western Alaskan Natives used wood whereas the eastern Inuit used whalebone due to the treeless landscape). Kayaks are believed to be at least 4,000 years old. The oldest existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich, with the oldest dating from 1577.[3]
×