Always wanted to learn to kayak or Stand Up Paddleboard, or looking to hone your whitewater paddling skills? Zoar Outdoor, New England’s leader in outdoor adventure, has assembled a team of friendly, professional guides and instructors to help you explore our local lakes and rivers. We offer everything from take-away rentals with minimal guidance so you can set out on your own, up to advanced whitewater instruction programs, and everything in between! Explore all the different options below and start planning your perfect day on the water!
Before getting into the water, all beginners should first learn how to handle the paddle.The part of the paddle you hold is called the shaft. The proper way to hold a paddle is to place your hands slightly farther than shoulder width apart on the shaft. Oftentimes, one mistake that beginner kayakers make is holding the paddle incorrectly. One side of the blade is concave and should always be facing you. Slice the paddle blade vertically into the water, keeping a relaxed grip on the shaft with your knuckles pointed upward. Keeping this form will put more power into your paddle without exerting more energy.

Kayak Pittsburgh is a kayaking rental concession owned and operated by Venture Outdoors. With three convenient locations, you can choose to kayak the three rivers in the heart of Pittsburgh or enjoy the serene scenes of North Park Lake. We pride ourselves in giving you the best customer service to make your on-water experience unforgettable. No experience is necessary and most folks learn how to manage a kayak in 10 to 15 minutes.
Many a conversation have taken place as to whether you should build your own DIY kayak trailer or buy a manufactured one. If you are mechanically-inclined enough to rig or weld your Harbor Freight trailer into a taller, leveled, multi-kayak device, go for it! But for many of us who prefer to spend our time on the water and in our kayaks, having a high-quality trailer that we can back up to, hook up, and go is all the work we need. The expert brands that make trailers these days have been through enough iterations to have a perfect product for all levels of paddlers.
FOR THE PERSON THAT HAS MORE THAN 1 CANOE, KAYAK OR SMALL BOAT. THIS UNIT HAS 250 POUND CAPACITY AND WILL HOLD 2 CANOES OR UP TO 4 KAYAKS. IT HAS ADJUSTABLE 72" WIDE CROSSBARS (FRONT TO REAR) AND A FULLY ADJUSTABLE AXLE, FOR TONGUE WEIGHT. ADJUSTABLE TIE DOWN LOOPS (6) ARE ALSO STANDARD. THE PERFECT "FAMILY TRAILER". IT IS 14' 11" LONG AND 72" WIDE (AT THE CROSSBARS). 1 7/8" BALL COUPLER

We reviewed dozens of kayak trailers to identify the best of the best. When looking for a trailer for your kayak (or kayaks), there are some features you’ll want to consider and we found the what and the why of which does what. We looked at kayak trailers you tow with your vehicle and hand trailers that let you get your kayaks into the water without the chaos.


Stitch & Glue designs typically use modern, marine-grade plywood — eighth-inch, 3 millimetres (0.12 in) or up to quarter-inch, 5 millimetres (0.20 in) thick. After cutting out the required pieces of hull and deck (kits often have these pre-cut), a series of small holes are drilled along the edges. Copper wire is then used to "stitch" the pieces together through the holes. After the pieces are temporarily stitched together, they are glued with epoxy and the seams reinforced with fiberglass. When the epoxy dries, the copper stitches are removed. Sometimes the entire boat is then covered in fiberglass for additional strength and waterproofing though this adds greatly to the weight and is unnecessary. Construction is fairly straightforward, but because plywood does not bend to form compound curves, design choices are limited. This is a good choice for the first-time kayak builder as the labor and skills required (especially for kit versions) is considerably less than for strip-built boats which can take 3 times as long to build.
Buying a pre-built trailer is often quite a bit more expensive. For those who are on a tighter budget, buying one that you will have to build yourself is a much better option. Like most other things, buying online is a great way to reduce your price and get the best deal possible. If price is of serious concern to you then you may want to opt for a used trailer. These will typically run quite a bit cheaper but can be quite a bit harder to find.
Kayaking has always been a great way to relax and enjoy the water, but now more and more people are discovering that it’s also a great way to fish. Kayaks are quiet and can get into places where the fish are hiding—some places so narrow or shallow that motor boats can’t get into. There are lots of options, from sit-on-top and sit-inside to pedal-powered and motorized to hybrid, so explore and then choose the right one for you and the fishing you do.
Modern kayaks serve diverse purposes, ranging from slow and easy touring on placid water, to racing and complex maneuvering in fast-moving whitewater, to fishing and long-distance ocean excursions. Modern forms, materials and construction techniques make it possible to effectively serve these needs while continuing to leverage the insights of the original Arctic inventors.

Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq (ᖃᔭᖅ Inuktitut pronunciation: [qɑˈjɑq]), Yup'ik: qayaq (from qai- "surface; top"),[2] Aleut: Iqyax) were originally developed by the Inuit, Yup'ik, and Aleut. They used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched seal or other animal skins stretched over a wood or whalebone-skeleton frame. (Western Alaskan Natives used wood whereas the eastern Inuit used whalebone due to the treeless landscape). Kayaks are believed to be at least 4,000 years old. The oldest existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich, with the oldest dating from 1577.[3]

Whitewater kayaks are rotomolded in a semi-rigid, high impact plastic, usually polyethylene. Careful construction ensures that the boat remains structurally sound when subjected to fast-moving water. The plastic hull allows these kayaks to bounce off rocks without leaking, although they scratch and eventually puncture with enough use. Whitewater kayaks range from 4 to 10 feet (1.2 to 3.0 m) long. There are two main types of whitewater kayak:


The appeal of inflatable kayaks is their portability, their durability (they don't dent), ruggedness in white water (they bounce off rocks rather than break) and their easy storage. In addition, inflatable kayaks generally are stable, have a small turning radius and are easy to master, although some models take more effort to paddle and are slower than traditional kayaks.
Transport your kayaks, canoes and other boats from point A to point B with help from the kayak trailers for sale at Academy.com. First, select a kayak trailer that offers ample space and a considerable weight capacity in order to accommodate several watercraft at once. Make sure your kayak trailer of choice is made from rugged materials, such as marine-grade galvanized steel, to ensure long-term strength, even when it's exposed to the elements. Need kayak trailers that can be adjusted to meet your unique needs? Look for a kayak trailer with versatile load bars that accommodate various accessories. For storage convenience, consider a kayak trailer that can be stored vertically, so it stays out of the way until kayaking season is back in full swing.
A kayak trailer easily tows behind most vehicles and typically requires a simple hitch and electrical connection to enable brake lights. They are low to the ground, easier to load and are able to carry even the largest of kayaks, making them the perfect solution to the kayak-wrestling dilemma. Many of the most popular trailers are also able to haul bicycles, canoes and even cargo boxes, making them as versatile as any roof rack and, with multiple sizes available, many trailers surpass roof racks in carrying capacity.

It is important to consider how long of a kayak your trailer will be able to accommodate for the main reason if you don’t want a lot of overhang. Having overhang on your trailer can result in your kayak not sitting as securely and can risk an accident. More than just tandem kayaks, ocean kayaks tend to be a lot longer in length as well so be sure to consider this before purchasing.


A specialized variant of racing craft called a surf ski has an open cockpit and can be up to 21 feet (6.4 m) long but only 18 inches (46 cm) wide, requiring expert balance and paddling skill. Surf skis were originally created for surf and are still used in races in New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa. They have become popular in the United States for ocean races, lake races and even downriver races.
Every single kayak trailer has a maximum weight rating. If you already have a kayak it’s important to check it’s weight as to not exceed the trailers limit. The average kayak will weigh around 40 lbs while the typical single large kayak trailer can be be rated for a weight of about 200 lbs. If you exceed the limit you can risk it breaking in transit.
Inflatables, also known as the duckies or IKs, can usually be transported by hand using a carry bag. They are generally made of hypalon (a kind of neoprene), Nytrylon (a rubberized fabric), PVC, or polyurethane coated cloth. They can be inflated with foot, hand or electric pumps. Multiple compartments in all but the least expensive increase safety. They generally use low pressure air, almost always below 3 psi.
The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. The cockpit is sometimes covered by a spray deck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray, differentiating the craft from a canoe. The spray deck makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler.
×