Paddle: A paddle is as essential as the kayak itself. When choosing paddles, you’ll need to consider the measurement of your torso and the width of kayak you’ll be paddling. There are sizing charts available but generally, torso heights over 28 inches will use paddle lengths of 200 centimeters and above, torso heights under 28 inches will use paddle lengths under 200 centimeters.
Nearly all trailers can haul more than one kayak. This is a great way to transport your friend’s or family’s kayak. When hauling more than one kayak it’s important to ensure your vehicle is able to handle that much weight. Keep in mind that you not only have to factor in the weight of the kayaks but also the weight of the trailer and any other gear strapped to the trailer.
Kayak trailers can be more money than a roof rack but can offer you more room storage space on top of your car. This is especially ideal for those looking to carry more kayaks or who don’t want to drill holes into the roof of their car. As with every purchase you make, it is important to consider cost. You do not want to step outside of your price limits as this change in budget can make you unhappy with this purchase.
Although I wanted the basic trailer when I first contacted the company, I’m now glad I upgraded to one of the utility bed models. Rather than stuffing my small SUV with pedal drives, gear crates, seats, paddles and fishing tackle, I now bungee stuff beneath my kayaks. It speeds up loading, and I can rinse the salt off my kayaks and fishing gear simultaneously. Transporting salty accessories on the trailer also protects the interior of my SUV from corrosion. After hosing everything off, I just back the loaded trailer into the garage, keeping my kayaks and gear secure overnight, ready for the morning fishing trip. The bed design prevents pooling water, so gear dries quickly and very little water drips on my garage floor. [ read the entire review here 10/6/17 ]

1) You do not need to buy a top of the line kayak, but you do need to talk to some experienced people about the best kind of kayak for the water you plan to be fishing, combined with your height/weight and paddling ability. I see articles stating that you can start with a $200 kayak. That’s true, for some folks. But I’ve fielded a lot of phone calls from people who bought big box store kayaks that can’t carry their weight. It helps to talk to people who know kayaks, before you buy.


This might seem weird, but you’d be surprised how often experienced kayak anglers use their feet in some way while fishing. If your boat is narrow enough, you can actually use them as rudders to steer your drift on rivers, and they work as great anchors when fishing rip rap, laydowns, and other shallow areas – simply stick a foot out and hold on to the log until you’re done fishing the hole. Feet are also great for re-directing the boat from a stump, log, or other obstacle while your hands are busy fighting a fish.

You can strap virtually anything to a car given the right gear and thorough enough straps. The most efficient way would be to buy specialized kayak racks intended for strapping your kayak to your car. But you can strap your kayak (or two, but probably not more than two safely) with just the roof rack and cross bars. Without the cross bars, you’ll certainly lose security and driving at normal speeds with kayak(s) aboard will become a safety concern.


Wearing a fishing life jacket for your safety is a given. What else should you wear if you’re planning an all-day fishing trip? Sun protective clothing. In addition to long or short sleeve shirts, we offer hats, neck gaiters, shorts and pants that provide UPF (Ultraviolet Protection Factor) ratings of 30 to 50+. That means they absorb or block UVA and UVB radiation from the sun that not only causes skin damage and premature aging, but increases your risk of skin cancer. This is equally important on cloudy days when most of the sun’s rays still pass through the clouds. You’ll also want to apply (and re-apply as directed) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or more to any skin not covered by your clothing. A good pair of sunglasses will also protect your eyes from damaging UV radiation and improve visibility and comfort by filtering out glare.
One type, the playboat, is short, with a scooped bow and blunt stern. These trade speed and stability for high maneuverability. Their primary use is performing tricks in individual water features or short stretches of river. In playboating or freestyle competition (also known as rodeo boating), kayakers exploit the complex currents of rapids to execute a series of tricks, which are scored for skill and style.
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What gear do you need before you embark? Paddles and life jackets to be sure, but how about getting your kayak from the garage to the water? Dollies and car racks designed specifically for kayaks are the answer. And, when you’re out on the water, how about a third hand? As that is not actually possible, perhaps an anchor, a rod holder and landing gear would help. We’ve got all the accessories you need for epic kayak fishing expeditions.

The body of the paddler must also be taken into account. A paddler with a low center of gravity will find all boats more stable; for a paddler with a high center of gravity, all boats will feel tippier. On average, women and children have a lower COG than men.[6][8][9] Unisex kayaks are built for men.[7] A paddler with narrow shoulders will also want a narrower kayak.

Transport your kayaks, canoes and other boats from point A to point B with help from the kayak trailers for sale at Academy.com. First, select a kayak trailer that offers ample space and a considerable weight capacity in order to accommodate several watercraft at once. Make sure your kayak trailer of choice is made from rugged materials, such as marine-grade galvanized steel, to ensure long-term strength, even when it's exposed to the elements. Need kayak trailers that can be adjusted to meet your unique needs? Look for a kayak trailer with versatile load bars that accommodate various accessories. For storage convenience, consider a kayak trailer that can be stored vertically, so it stays out of the way until kayaking season is back in full swing.
1) You do not need to buy a top of the line kayak, but you do need to talk to some experienced people about the best kind of kayak for the water you plan to be fishing, combined with your height/weight and paddling ability. I see articles stating that you can start with a $200 kayak. That’s true, for some folks. But I’ve fielded a lot of phone calls from people who bought big box store kayaks that can’t carry their weight. It helps to talk to people who know kayaks, before you buy.

Traditional multi-hull vessels such as catamarans and outrigger canoes benefit from increased lateral stability without sacrificing speed, and these advantages have been successfully applied in twin hull kayaks. Outrigger kayaks attach one or two smaller hulls to the main hull to enhance stability, especially for fishing, touring, kayak sailing and motorized kayaking. Twin hull kayaks feature two long and narrow hulls, and since all their buoyancy is distributed as far as possible from their center line, they are stabler than mono hull kayaks outfitted with outriggers.
Novices often use both rudders and skegs incorrectly and often forget to pull them up in shallow water, which can cause damage. For this reason, it’s simplest to leave them undeployed. Paddling without your rudder encourages you to learn better paddling technique more quickly. And if it’s so windy that you need a skeg or rudder, you really shouldn’t be paddling without an experienced guide who can explain how to use them properly.
These manufacturers offer special models for fishing that are designed and accessorized for this sport, including specially designed hatches, built-in coolers & rod holders, gps receivers and equipment mounts. Other accessories include live wells, anchor trolleys and running lights. Specially designed fishing kayaks usually have designs similar to those of recreational sit-in and sit-on-top kayaks characterized by very wide beams (up to 36 inches) that increase lateral stability. The increases stability allows for the angler to stand up and fish on the kayak. These kayaks provide a considerable space for storage inside their hulls which allow the angler to stow rods, fishing gear, batteries for fish finders, extra paddles, anchors, and wheels to tow the kayak from vehicle to the water. The cutouts molded into the top of the kayaks are well-suited to hold milk crates with additional supplies. Some anglers equip their fishing kayaks with outriggers to further increase stability.[3] In recent years people have begun using kayaks for fly fishing, most models suited for upright fly casting include upright braces that allow you to safely stand up.[4]
Inuit kayak builders had specific measurements for their boats. The length was typically three times the span of his outstretched arms. The width at the cockpit was the width of the builder's hips plus two fists (and sometimes less). The typical depth was his fist plus the outstretched thumb (hitch hiker). Thus typical dimensions were about 17 feet (5.2 m) long by 20–22 inches (51–56 cm) wide by 7 inches (18 cm) deep. This measurement system confounded early European explorers who tried to duplicate the kayak, because each kayak was a little different.
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