Although I wanted the basic trailer when I first contacted the company, I’m now glad I upgraded to one of the utility bed models. Rather than stuffing my small SUV with pedal drives, gear crates, seats, paddles and fishing tackle, I now bungee stuff beneath my kayaks. It speeds up loading, and I can rinse the salt off my kayaks and fishing gear simultaneously. Transporting salty accessories on the trailer also protects the interior of my SUV from corrosion. After hosing everything off, I just back the loaded trailer into the garage, keeping my kayaks and gear secure overnight, ready for the morning fishing trip. The bed design prevents pooling water, so gear dries quickly and very little water drips on my garage floor. [ read the entire review here 10/6/17 ]

Just like boating, surfing and any other watersport, kayaking can place a kayaker’s health and safety at risk — especially if the individual fails to practice responsible safety precautions. Even though these dangers exist, you can still have a fantastic adventure in your kayak. Creating and following a safety checklist can help you have a safe and fun experience on the water.


Hoping Everyone had a Happy Holiday Season and Wishing You A Very Fishy Year in 2019!!! Come January, while many fisheries are gearing up for next season pursuits like striped bass or waiting for various fisheries to open, others appreciate winter targets.  Northern fishing lodges are long shuttered and somebody somewhere’s out there checking the ice.  Thinking back on the years, it’s clear that kayaks make the season longer for most fisheries where you don’t need an ice hut.  Beyond the Golden State, I’m seeing a lot of nice action along the Gulf for redfish and it appears, kayak bass fishing never […]
The Australian Military MKII and MKIII folding kayaks were extensively used during the 1941-1945 Pacific War for some 33 raids and missions on and around the South-East Asian islands. Documentation for this will be found in the National Archives of Australia official records, reference No. NAA K1214-123/1/06. They were deployed from disguised watercraft, submarines, Catalina aircraft, P.T. boats, motor launches and by parachute.[29]
Kayak trailers need to made of a lightweight yet durable material. This job usually goes to a specialized type of steel. Galvanized steel is not only light and strong but also rust resistant. This allows you to pull right up to the water, and even into it, to launch your kayak. Knowing that you can use your trailer the way you want will increase the amount of time you’ll use it.
Flight Atlanta - Orlando (ATL - MCO) $58+ Flight Detroit - Orlando (DTW - MCO) $63+ Flight Philadelphia - Orlando (PHL - MCO) $66+ Flight Denver - Orlando (DEN - MCO) $70+ Flight Houston - Orlando (HOU - MCO) $71+ Flight Houston - Orlando (IAH - MCO) $71+ Flight Minneapolis - Orlando (MSP - MCO) $77+ Flight Washington - Orlando (BWI - MCO) $93+ Flight Boston - Orlando (BOS - MCO) $97+
The instructions for how you get out of a kayak are easy to remember — just complete the steps in reverse. When exiting on the shore, paddle your kayak into shallow water or as close to the land as possible. Swing your legs out of the kayak, gain your footing and stand up. When exiting the kayak on a dock, turn your body to face the dock and pull yourself out of the kayak.
Kayaking has always been a great way to relax and enjoy the water, but now more and more people are discovering that it’s also a great way to fish. Kayaks are quiet and can get into places where the fish are hiding—some places so narrow or shallow that motor boats can’t get into. There are lots of options, from sit-on-top and sit-inside to pedal-powered and motorized to hybrid, so explore and then choose the right one for you and the fishing you do.
The instructions for how you get out of a kayak are easy to remember — just complete the steps in reverse. When exiting on the shore, paddle your kayak into shallow water or as close to the land as possible. Swing your legs out of the kayak, gain your footing and stand up. When exiting the kayak on a dock, turn your body to face the dock and pull yourself out of the kayak.
"An excellent kayak that is a pleasure to fish from . I can pedal in 12-13 inches of water and not worry about the prop . Cruising at 3.5 mph is very easy for a couple of hours , but trying to go fast is a waste of time . The hull will push water instead of slicing through it . The ride is very dry and the seat is about 5.5" above the floor so even in rough water..."
Kayaks were adapted for military use in the Second World War. Used mainly by British Commando and special forces, principally the Combined Operations Pilotage Parties (COPPs), the Special Boat Service and the Royal Marines Boom Patrol Detachment. The latter made perhaps the best known use of them in the Operation Frankton raid on Bordeaux harbor.[24] Both the Special Air Service (SAS) and the Special Boat Service (SBS) used kayaks for reconnaissance in the 1982 Falklands War.[25] US Navy SEALs reportedly used them at the start of Unified Task Force operations in Somalia in 1992.[26] The SBS currently use Klepper two-man folding kayaks that can be launched from surfaced submarines or carried to the surface by divers from submerged ones. They can be parachuted from transport aircraft into the ocean or dropped from the back of Chinook helicopters.[27] US Special Forces have used Kleppers but now primarily use Long Haul folding kayaks, which are made in the US.[28]

As there is a wide selection of options when it comes to kayak trailers, understanding what you are buying is important. To get a full picture of the trailer you are choosing you will want to thoroughly compare trailer options to others on the market. Not just in price but in features as well. Looking at the trailer weight is especially important in determining what type of car you will need to tow it.
"An excellent kayak that is a pleasure to fish from . I can pedal in 12-13 inches of water and not worry about the prop . Cruising at 3.5 mph is very easy for a couple of hours , but trying to go fast is a waste of time . The hull will push water instead of slicing through it . The ride is very dry and the seat is about 5.5" above the floor so even in rough water..."
Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq (ᖃᔭᖅ Inuktitut pronunciation: [qɑˈjɑq]), Yup'ik: qayaq (from qai- "surface; top"),[2] Aleut: Iqyax) were originally developed by the Inuit, Yup'ik, and Aleut. They used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched seal or other animal skins stretched over a wood or whalebone-skeleton frame. (Western Alaskan Natives used wood whereas the eastern Inuit used whalebone due to the treeless landscape). Kayaks are believed to be at least 4,000 years old. The oldest existing kayaks are exhibited in the North America department of the State Museum of Ethnology in Munich, with the oldest dating from 1577.[3]
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